The College of Family and Consumer Sciences (FACS) brings together scientists and students dedicated to inquiring and innovating for human health, enhancing strong and resilient families and communities, developing innovative new materials and products, and enhancing quality of life through the land-grant mission. The objectives of the FACS Strategic Plan 2010-2020 http://www.fcs.uga.edu/college/strategy-plan  are to build on excellence in graduate education by increasing funding, providing flexible course offerings, and establishing collaborations across colleges by increasing enrollment, enhancing both the quantity and number of assistantships and travel awards, and developing online offerings.

Four academic departments in the college provide BS, MS and PhD degrees, including an online MS degree, and interdisciplinary graduate certificates. Current (FY16) total college graduate student enrollment is 167 (87 MS and 80 PhD). In five years we propose to increase the total enrollment of graduate students in FACS by ~75%. Most of the growth will be in PhD students (page 4) and in non-thesis accelerated BS/MS (page 6). The current FACS student/faculty mentor ratio is 2.4 (n=67 current graduate faculty). Future faculty commitment to mentoring graduate students will be increased to two students (MS-thesis or PhD) per graduate faculty with an enhanced enrollment of 150 MS-thesis and PhD students and four to six Non-Thesis (N-T) students per graduate faculty involved with accelerated BS/MS and MS N-T options.

Summary of FACS Graduate Enrollment 2015 and 2020 – Table 1:

Degree Name

Current Enrollment

Proposed 2020 Enrollment

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

80

117

Masters of Science (MS) – Thesis

37

31

Masters of Science (MS) - Non-Thesis and Online NT

45

91

Accelerated BS/MS Non-Thesis

5

72

College Totals

167

311

RATIONALE – PhD Programs

The primary reasons why we project growth in the PhD programs are the recent hiring of a large number of new tenure-track faculty in the college since 2010 when the Strategic Plan for the College was completed and the hiring of a new dean and three new department heads. The college research infrastructure has expanded and improved over the past four years through reassignment of and expansion of research space and the remodeling and equipping of labs through MRR and OVPR and college start-up investments. Each new faculty member’s position has a significant percentage of time assigned to research and articulated expectation to mentor graduate students. Start-up packages for a large majority of the new hires include allocation of MS and/or PhD assistantships from the college for one to two years, and one month salary the first summer to help the new hire launch his/her research program and grant applications. The limiting factor of growth going forward will be accommodating graduate students in shared office space, yet to be resolved.

Doctor of Philosophy – Table 2:

Degree Name (Department)

Current Enrollment

Projected 2020 Enrollment

GROW or

MAINTAIN or

REDUCE

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

1

Foods and Nutrition  (FDN)

12

32

Grow

2

Financial Planning, Housing and Consumer Economics (FHCE)

25

30

Maintain

3

Human Development and Family Science (HDFS); HDFS Marriage and Family Therapy Emphasis Option

32

40

Grow

4

Textiles, Merchandising and Interiors (TMI) Polymer, Fiber and Textiles Sciences (PFTS); TMI PFTS International Merchandising emphasis option

11

15

Grow

TOTAL

80

117

Footnotes to Table 2:

  1. PhD program enrollment will grow in FDN to 32 in five years by increments of three per year, with a shift in focus from allocation of assistantships to the MS program to the doctoral students, combined with PhD assistantships plus tuition written into grants to receive 1.5.
  2. Given the recent significant growth in the FHCE PhD Programs to current level of 25, we will maintain at approximately 30 in FHCE where the quality of the applicants and the capacity of the faculty is a good balance at 30 students enrolled per year.
  3. HDFS doctoral enrollment will grow from 32 to 40 in five years by increments of three additional PhD students per year. The MFT Option of the doctoral degree in HDFS will maintain at 12.
  4. The TMI Polymer, Fiber and Textiles Sciences (PFTS) PhD program will grow one to two students per year to a level of 10 PhD students enrolled. The growth in FPS will take advantage of interdisciplinary hires with Engineering and Chemistry, new research laboratory space at River Bend North, and the new hire in Georgia Power Professorship in PFTS. TMI will maintain PhD students at 5 in International Merchandising option of the PFTS doctoral degree.

The Foods and Nutrition Department is poised to grow doctoral student enrollment to 32 by increments of 4 PhD students per year which is 20 more than current enrollment of 12. The unit has changed the priority of allocation of departmental assistantship funding to doctoral students. In the last three years the FDN department has hired eight new tenure-track assistant professors (9th national search in progress), a new tenure-track associate professor, and an endowed professor (increasing the number of endowed professorships to three). FDN faculty are also taking advantage of the UGA Provost’s initiative to support additional PhD assistantships when funded grants include PhD assistantships and tuition. For example, the FDN USDA SNAP-ED funded FY 16 grant includes an FDN PhD assistantship plus tuition thus generating additional (1.5 X) funding for FDN PhD assistantships.  There are also 3 pending FDN NIH R01 grants that have budgeted PhD assistantships plus tuition. An increasingly large number of highly qualified prospective PhD students seek out the FDN department due to their personal and professional interests in the research-based program areas of the faculty.  These research programs areas include those in the basic  and translational food and nutritional sciences (e.g. nutrition and genetics; gut microbiome; fatty acids and metabolomics;  epigenetic response to nutrients; phytochemicals and  immunological/inflammatory responses; micro-RNAs as nutrient biomarkers; nutrient impact on maternal/fetal health; bone health, food insecurity; food insecurity and health disparities, obesity/chronic disease prevention throughout the lifespan, and nutrition and performance (sports nutrition).The departmental research program areas address key issues that impact health promotion/disease prevention throughout the lifespan.  Faculty with basic research programs work collaboratively with other faculty with outreach programs to ensure that their research is translatable to human health. The USDA SNAP-ED grant funded program with a core research base will provide expanded opportunities for doctoral-level research projects integrated with the outreach components of the program. Two interdisciplinary hires with the College of Pharmacy and the College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences have expanded the number of interdisciplinary graduate courses; enhanced the number of graduate faculty to direct new interdisciplinary research programs and mentor graduate students; enhanced external funding opportunities to support new interdisciplinary research collaborations and graduate training programs.

The Human Development and Family Science Department will grow enrollment and the quality of the students. We seek the resources to continue to compete for the best and the brightest will be our highest priority. Our program in HDFS has been ranked as one of the most comprehensive in our field, among the top 20 schools in this area (http://u.osu.edu/adventuresinhdfs/the-hdfs-report/). Our HDFS doctoral program is nationally recognized with several HDFS faculty who are fellows in the National Council for Family Relations and in various divisions of the American Psychological Association. We have 3 endowed professorships and millions of dollars in funded grant proposals. In the next decade we want to further develop our niche integrating our scientist-practitioner orientation across the lifespan building upon prevention science and mixed methodologies that explore the development of children, couples, and families. HDFS faculty are also taking advantage of the UGA Provost’s initiative to support additional PhD assistantships when funded grants include PhD assistantships and tuition. For example, the HDFS Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education $8.2Mil grant includes six (6) PhD assistantships plus tuition thus generating additional (1.5 X) funding for HDFS PhD assistantships.  While minority students comprise approximately 25% of doctorates in the behavioral sciences in the U.S., this is a number we aspire to attain and exceed in our program. The demand for expertise in human development is growing, particularly with continuing needs for couples, parents and children, schools, and an aging population. The need for experts to support the elderly and veterans are projected to increase with overall job growth of 12 percent. Also, the diversification of the U.S. with ethnic minority and immigrant populations from Africa, Asia, and Latin America increases the need for scholars who can conduct research and evidence-based practice in ways that are culturally and linguistically sensitive. 

Our Financial Planning, Housing and Consumer Economics PhD program is gaining a world-known reputation as one of the best places for an education in financial planning and consumer economics at the doctoral level. The program has experienced significant growth over the past few years. In three years FHCE enrollment increased more than 200%, growing from just 20 graduate students to more than 60 total. For these reasons we plan to maintain enrollment, but recruit the best and brightest students. Considering current graduate assistantship funding and number of graduate faculty, we would like to maintain our PhD enrollment at around 30. Currently, the majority of students have declared financial planning as their area of emphasis, followed by consumer economics. We only have 3 housing PhD students currently.  In the future, we would like to see those numbers more equally distributed. A new interdisciplinary Certificate in Urban and Metropolitan Studies is being proposed through the Department of Geography. We have a joint hire, 20% in FHCE and 80% in Geography which will help facilitate our participation in this Certificate and the potential to promote interest in the housing master's and PhD degree programs.  Our FHCE interdisciplinary hire with the College of Public Health has expanded the number of interdisciplinary graduate courses in housing and gerontology.

FHCE has a very diverse group of PhD students (14 international, 4 African American, 1 Hispanic, 8 White; 14 female and 13 male). These students help in recruiting more diverse students and support each other through the program.

The Textiles, Merchandising and Interiors Department will grow the PhD program with two recent faculty hires with expertise in biomaterials, biocomposites, nanomaterials and nanotechnology.  The growth in Polymer, Fiber and Textile Science (PFTS) will take advantage of interdisciplinary hires with Engineering and Chemistry, new research laboratory space at River Bend North, and the new hire in Georgia Power Professorship. These are strengths that will attract domestic and international students to the PFTS PhD program and prepare students for employment opportunities in these emerging areas of research. Development of the new area of research will attract international students and students subsidized by industry.  TMI PFTS faculty will also take advantage of the UGA Provost’s initiative to support additional PhD assistantships when large funded grants include PhD assistantships and tuition. The PhD enrollment will be maintained in the International Merchandising emphasis option. We are at capacity given the number of faculty supporting PhD students in this field in the department.

RATIONALE – MS Thesis and Non-Thesis Programs

In Foods and Nutrition, we are stable with an enrollment of 12, the level at which we are nationally accredited. Six students in the MS/DI program graduate each August and 6 new graduate students begin the MS/DI program.  Graduates of the MS-DI program are all employed within a few months of graduation with a perfect pass rate on registration exam to become registered dietitians (RD). Graduates of the MS-DI program are eligible to take the RD exam and apply for entry-level dietetic positions. They are also prepared to pursue a PhD degree because the FDN MS-DI program is research based and requires the completion of a thesis.  It would be very difficult to increase the number of MS/DI students due to the limitations of internship sites, RD preceptors in clinical and community sites and the required number of departmental faculty who are on fiscal year contracts with PhD, RD credentials for accreditation.

The growth of MS-NT students in financial planning and consumer economics (with an applied consumer analytics focus) will be a natural complement to the growth of the BSFCS/MS in both of these areas. We do not see the housing emphasis MS-NT growing in the near future given the commitment of faculty to teach the undergraduate courses in the housing major. We do not see the thesis master's as a growth area for FHCE at this time without additional assistantship funding.

A master's degree in Human Development and Family Science is an important degree for those wishing to do applied work in human services, non-profits, and governmental agencies with children and families. We will individuals wishing to earn the MS in HDFS for work in an applied area (i.e, Extension, human services, non-profit sectors, K-12 support) https://www.ncfr.org/infographic-career-opportunities-family-science. The department will develop a hybrid on-campus/online program with courses already taught in the department that focus on topics such as family and social policies, family life education, and families and social change. The applied MS in HDFS is a program that will be developed to attract individuals seeking career enhancement as well as students who are not yet employed but wish to pursue a career in an applied HDFS field.  UGA has been ranked by college factual in the top 10 programs in HDFS http://www.collegefactual.com/majors/family-consumer-human-sciences/human-development-family-studies/.  In that using research to improve the lives of Georgia citizens is important to the our UGA land-grant mission, we think it is important to continue to train empirically informed practitioners who can assist in disseminating evidence-based practices for individuals and families in Georgia. However, given that the duration of a MS program is insufficient to become fully ingrained in faculty research, we are sensitive to the number of students to admit. The requirement for continued employment as of July 1, 2015 for new hires of County Extension Agents without Master’s Degrees is to obtain Public Service Faculty status through acquiring a master’s degree, or a high level of scholarship, within five years of employment. Within the public service faculty of Cooperative Extension, the Associate Dean for Extension and Outreach in the College has reviewed the credentials of the county based Family and Consumer Science (FACS) Extension Agents. Currently there are ten county FACS Extension Agents without Master’s degrees. The 4-H department has estimated that 25 county 4-H Extension Agents across the state do not have Master’s Degrees.  Additionally, there is an estimated 30 additional bachelor-degreed field staff employees within UGA Extension who might want to take advantage of an online Master’s degree.

Textiles, Merchandising and Interiors offers a strong program at the master's level with many of our students in any of the focus areas (merchandising; historic/cultural; polymer, fiber and textile sciences; and interiors) going into doctoral programs for careers in research and teaching. Others have pursued and obtained industry jobs in product development and design, retailing and interior design. New faulty in the area of product design and development will help grow this area of focus for the Master of Science programs. Based on current industry trends the Furnishings and Interiors (FI) focus area will specialize in sustainability, aging in place, universal design and adaptive reuse.  Furthermore, because of the breadth of the faculty's expertise the students in the FI focus area will be able to collaborate with UGA's Historic Preservation graduate program and the other academic programs in FACS. The curriculum for PFTS was modified in 2014 with the development of several new courses, faculty research expertise in nanotechnology and biomaterials, and a new CIP code designating this as a STEM discipline. Increase of graduate assistantship funding for Master of Science students is crucial to our growth 

Master of Science (MS) Thesis, Non-Thesis and Certification program  – Table 3:

Degree Name (Department)

Current Enrollment

Projected 2020 Enrollment

GROW or

MAINTAIN or

REDUCE

Master of Science (MS)

1

Foods and Nutrition - Dietetics Internship (MS DI); FDN MS; SND Certification Program

31

33

Maintain

2

Financial Planning, Housing and Consumer Economics MS-Thesis; Financial Planning and Consumer Economics MS-Non-Thesis (NT); FHCE Online MS-NT in Financial Planning

37

55

Grow

3

Human Development and Family Science (HDFS); HDFS Child Life Emphasis Option

9

11

Maintain

4

Textiles, Merchandising and Interiors

11

10

Maintain

TOTAL

70

109

Footnotes to Table 3:

  1. FDN will maintain enrollment at 12 in the combined MS/Dietetics Internship program. It is anticipated the non-MS DI enrollment will only grow from 3 to 6 students. Enrollment in the School Nutrition Directors (SND) Certification Program http://www.fcs.uga.edu/fdn/graduate-programs-sndcp-how-to-apply will maintain at 15.
  2. FHCE MS degree will maintain an enrollment of 5 students per year in the thesis programs in housing, consumer economics or financial planning. We will be selective and enroll the best and brightest with trajectories in PhD programs. More students could be attracted to MS Thesis options with adequate assistantship funding. The Online Financial Planning MS-NT degree in FHCE is fully online now with two 2-year cohorts enrolled, currently 21 students. We will grow to 15 students per cohort enrolled each year, so our target of 30 students in the online program will be easily achieved in a year. The MS-NT in financial planning and consumer economics (with an applied consumer analytics focus) in FHCE will grow from 8 to 20 in five years.
  3. HDFS will grow by refocusing our MS degrees to provide an applied focus (i.e. Extension, non-profit sectors, K-12 support), doubling current MS degree students from 5 to 10. The thesis program in HDFS with an emphasis in Child Life will maintain enrollment over the next five years in favor of the accelerated BS/MS degree.
  4. The MS thesis degree in TMI will maintain at 10 enrolled students. A non-thesis option will be considered for those who wish to work in industry. The thesis option will be for those who wish to continue onto doctoral level programs.

RATIONALE: The BS/MS Accelerated Master of Science Degree will be the greatest area of change in degree programs with growth in enrollment for from 5 to 72 in five years in three departments. Diversity of students enrolled in the fields of Dietetics and Child Life, along with Financial Planning, will be of utmost concern as the requirements by external credentialing organizations move from BS to MS in the very near future. The BS/MS accelerated non-thesis and assistance with practicum and internship experiences, coupled with very personalized advising will be ways in which we can off-set the additional costs of completing the MS which often impacts minority and underrepresented groups.

BS/MS Accelerated Master of Science Degree – Table 4

Emphasis/Option (Department)

Current Enrollment

Projected 2020 Enrollment

GROW

MAINTAIN

REDUCE

Accelerated BS/MS Options

1

BS/MS FDN – Current options are in Consumer Foods, Dietetics, Nutritional Sciences

1

25

Grow

2

BS/MS FHCE – Current options are in Financial Planning, in Housing, and in Consumer Economics

4

35

Grow

3

BS/MS HDFS - The Accelerated Child Life MS  will be a new option in 2017

0

12

Grow

TOTAL

5

72

Footnotes to Table 4:

  1. FDN will aggressively pursue an increase in five years to 25 to meet the needs of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics which has changed the standard for entry-level dietitians from a BS to an MS degree to be effective in the near future.
  2. FHCE will grow substantially the accelerated BS/MS in Financial Planning FHCE in five years due to competitively paid, plentiful career opportunities; the target enrollment in 2021 will be 20 BS/MS students. The BS/MS in Consumer Economics in FHCE will grow from zero currently to 15 by capitalizing on the demand for Applied Consumer Analytics graduates and corresponding coursework. Faculty expertise and collaboration will fit within the Informatics initiative of UGA.
  3. HDFS proposes a new joint, accelerated program between UGA and Georgia Regents University/ Augusta University by fall 2017 to meet the MS degrees of Child Life Certification (CLC) eligibility requirements and grow enrollment in the BS/MS. Effective in 2022, to establish eligibility for certification, candidates will be required to hold either a master’s degree in child life OR a master’s degree with a concentration or emphasis in child life (e.g. MS in Human Development and Family Science with a concentration in Child Life) from an academic program that has been accredited by CLC.  Effective in 2025 this requirement will be amended by CLC to require that all certification candidates hold a master’s degree in child life from an accredited academic unit.

RATIONALE: Graduate Certificate Programs

Unlike the undergraduate certificates which Banner/Athena provide readily accessible enrollment information, the interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate enrollment figures are not easy to obtain. 

Graduate Certificate Programs: Table 5

Certificate Name (Department)

Current Enrollment

(best guess)

Projected 2020 Enrollment

GROW

MAINTAIN

REDUCE

Graduate Certificates

1

Obesity & Weight Management (FDN)

10

25

Grow

2

Quantitative Methods in Family Science (HDFS)

7-8

10

Maintain

3

Marriage and Family Therapy (HDFS)

8

10

Maintain

Footnotes to Table 5:

  1. The Obesity and Weight Management Certificate initiated in Fall 2014 will grow over the next five years to 25 enrolled across a variety of departments, colleges and disciplines of the university. Online courses are under development and demand will continue to grow.
  2. The HDFS Quantitative Methods in Family Science Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificate began two years ago and will maintain over the next 5 years at 10. This certificate, while specializing in family oriented disciplines and large data, fits well with the Informatics initiative of the university. However, a small number of faculty with the expertise in family science limits growth.
  3. The Interdisciplinary Certificate in Marriage and Family Therapy (MFT) housed in HDFS department targeted to MS degree students is subscribed mostly by Social Work MSW students. We see no reason why we can’t support from faculty resources and expertise both MS and PhD MFT students and maintain FACS MS HDFS student enrollment to approximately 10.

RECRUITMENT STRATEGIES

PhD students in each department will be recruited in specific research funded areas through national advertising including a strong web-based advertising approach with links to specific research assistantship opportunities. Connecting potential students with faculty research expertise and mentoring will be accomplished through both high-tech (web and virtual recruiting materials) and high-touch efforts. Graduate Coordinators will meet regularly with the Dean to share best practices, update recruitment materials, and strategize means by which we can advance graduate studies in the college.

All the units are formulating plans for discipline specific fall “Open House” events as an opportunity for prospective students to meet with current PhD students and key faculty to learn about a wide range of academic programs and opportunities for doctoral students. Another approach that is planned for the upcoming year is the development of a "Virtual Open House" funded by the Graduate School Recruitment Enhancement Grant. The success of this endeavor will be shared with the other units.

As we move forward with aggressive advertising and recruitment plans for the BS/MS options described above, the College’s Student Success and Advising Center staff in general, and all admissions recruiters, all department academic advisors, as well and Undergraduate and Graduate Coordinators will be briefed and provided materials for early identification and advising potential BS/MS.

An informal survey of our current graduate students informed us that the first thing they look at is the career placements of previous graduate students. We will continue to update our webpages, ensuring we have updated information about our graduates and their placements. One endeavor will involve the production of videos for the web sites highlighting current PhD students actively engaged in their research programs. The college has recently developed a new “One-Button Studio” for recording videos. Another effort is being designed to visit feeder schools and hosting a recruitment table at various professional organization meetings. And, targeted GRE Search recruitment is expected to yield applicants who are well-suited to the graduate program and the careers afforded our graduates.

RETENTION AND SOFT SKILL DEVELOPMENT OF CURRENT STUDENTS

We are in the process of revising department application processes to be nimble and responsive to applicants. FHCE, for example, now welcomes both GRE and GMAT scores, and MS N-T applicants may have the GRE/GMAT waived if they meet certain academic or professional criteria. In the past five years graduate student retention in our college has averaged 73% to 100% currently across units. Faculty will continue their superior mentoring and individual attention provided to the graduate students. Other retention methods include organized research symposia/brown bags are held once each month for faculty and once each month for graduate students. Peer mentoring (buddy system) provides personalized connections to all incoming students. Routine meetings and social events also encourage retention. The professionalization seminar requirement for incoming and exiting students provides enculturation to the department and the discipline. Incoming students learn about graduate faculty research, navigating the processes associated with completion of the degree and time management/ writing skills. Exiting students learn about developing a cohesive curriculum vita, writing teaching philosophy statements, interviewing for academic and industry positions, and negotiating contracts. Preparation of the graduates of PhD programs for academic faculty positions include development of "soft skills" including participation in workshops designed to enhance professional communication skills provided by the Center for Teaching and Learning. Doctoral students are also encouraged to complete GRSC 7770 and other courses offered by CTL and to complete and to complete the requirements for the "Teaching Certificate" if their professional goal is an academic faculty position.

All PhD students are required to present two formal departmental seminars to faculty and other graduate students during the course of their doctoral program. PhD students are provided support to attend and present their research findings at state, regional and national conferences. The graduates of our doctoral programs also develop written communication skills during the process of preparing peer-reviewed journal publications and external grant proposals with faculty. We will provide additional trainings to help with writing grants and manuscripts. Additional mentoring opportunities for graduate students who are interested in pursuing career opportunities not directly related to their research programs. These opportunities could include organizing networking events that would bring graduate students together with young and established professionals. We will seek expanded opportunities through the Career Resource Center for graduate students to facilitate professional placement.

FUNDING IN SUPPORT OF GRADUATE STUDIES

The total annual allocation for graduate assistantships from the college to the four units is $611,000. This allocation is spread across both MS and PhD students in the units and provides for full 33% stipend assistantships to approximately 60 students. Given the plans for growth in enrollment, the dean proposes in FY17 to allocate dollars for three (3) high priority MS-level Thesis students to serve as teaching assistants and the remaining college assistantship funds to support PhD students’ assistantships. In this case, our college would require $1.57Mil for approximately 120 9-month PhD 33% assistantships by 2020 (not adjusted for inflation). At the rate of 50% funded by the college, and 50% funded by the units, we are on track to provide this level of PhD assistantships as we grow, with the caveat that non-thesis BS/MS, non-thesis MS students do not require assistantships.  

Travel funds, $20,000 annually, for current PhD students are allocated each fall and spring semester by the college, with departmental matching funds. The college annually allocates approximately $100,000 in scholarships from endowments for graduate students and will be enhancing scholarship funding going forward. The Virginia Wilbanks Kilgore Fund, $30,000 annually, will be earmarked as additional scholarship monies to “top off” the graduate recruitment packages. Both the departments of FDN and HDFS have graduate student academic support funds to enhance recruitment and enrollment. FHCE has proposals under consideration by two financial planning firms to provide monetary support for graduate student fellowships and travel and to support efforts to recruit a diverse group of students intending to become financial planners. There is interest from the food and beverage industry in how they can or should support the Obesity and Weight Management Graduate Certificate. FHCE has actively been pursuing industry and alumni donors to fund assistantships, scholarships and travel for graduate students and has had some success. Donors Warren Stribling, Don McNeill, DataPoints and Merrill Lynch funded assistantships and recruitment of diverse graduate students.  Similarly, FDN secured a $25,000 gift from the Katz Family to support graduate assistantships.

Our college Campaign Goals for Graduate Studies are to:

  • Increase the number of competitive assistantships through Graduate Fellowships ($1Mil);
  • Increase graduate student travel funds ($500,000);
  • Increase discretionary funds for interdisciplinary graduate degrees ($1.2Mil including e-rate);
  • Add to existing speaker fund or establish new endowment for “The Science of Family and Consumer Sciences Research Symposia” ($250,000); and
  • Increase department discretionary academic support funds for graduate studies ($400,000).

Total Campaign Goal to Enhance Graduate Studies is $2,150,000.

STEPS TO SUPPORT THESE STRATEGIC GOALS OVER THE NEXT FIVE YEARS

Curriculum and courses changes underway:

  1. In FHCE, seven (7) Financial Planning content courses are dual-level and by Fall 2016 these courses will be split into separate undergraduate and graduate courses. Management of additional courses teaching load will be managed by hiring a clinical assistant or associate professor in financial planning. This is based on growth in student credit hours and will be monitored closely.
  2. Online versions of Certificate courses are undergoing development and approval, including FDNS6240e Nutrition and Obesity Across the Lifespan (online), which is scheduled (Fall 2016). Currently offered graduate on-line courses will continue to be offered with an expanded number of sections (e.g. FDNS 6050E Nutrition Through the Lifecycle).  New online course will be offered at the graduate level, TXMI 7240 Retailing. Additional online graduate courses will be considered.

Curriculum changes to undertake in 2016:

  1. Develop a new fully online or hybrid MS degree in applied Human Development and Family Science for Extension professionals and others.
  2. We will need assistance in developing a business plan for a potential new online MS degree in Foods and Nutrition with specified tracks for prospective students with diverse professional goals that require a MS degree (e.g. dietetics; school nutrition programs; Extension).
  3. More graduate courses in nutrition and pharmacy will be offered using the "Flipped" classroom approach which incorporates both on-line and classroom components.  This approach is being used by our newly hired Assistant Professor in an interdisciplinary position with the College of Pharmacy.

Coordinated recruitment efforts at college and university level:

  1. The college will need coordinated recruitment efforts with the university starting in high schools and preview to freshman year events. We will need to develop strategies for the college on how to best recruit and advise potential and enrolled students on degree planning for the BS/MS. We will need the university admissions, Graduate School, Career Center to all consistently communicate how HOPE scholarship can continue throughout BS/MS degree completion.
  2. We will need coordinated curriculum within the Departments and articulated programs of study which all college advisors utilize. The move to centralized advising in FACS is to our advantage and will be further refined for the BS/MS programs. We will require expeditious processing in curriculum committees in the college and university and support from existing programs serving professionals who could benefit from applied MS degree.

RESOURCES NEEDED: Ideas and requests for additional non-financial resources from UGA

  1. Online MS degree programs need centralized support from the Office of Online Learning. We are dependent upon the partnership with the UGA Office of Online Learning for marketing and faculty development. In the future we will need the OOL to help construct a sustainable course delivery infrastructure; Assist with online course development; Provide tools and guidelines for transitioning program content to online format; Assist in the establishment of a quality review process for courses; Collaborate with faculty to determine individual training needs as they develop and revise their courses; Offer classes and workshops to support faculty development in developing and teaching online courses; Provide Fellowships to support course development; Facilitate ongoing faculty support with revising and updating online content, review and assessment; Provide program marketing to support growth of the program and promote the overall brand; and Offer advice on leveraging our e-rate budget for marketing/recruiting purposes.
  2. Tracking Post-Graduate Employment. The four departments in the college varied widely in terms of current practices and future strategies for tracking graduate students current progress, time to graduation, and post-graduate employment. This is a high need area for centralized support from the Graduate School. We applaud the implementation of a Graduate Student Tracking Data Base.

Respectfully submitted by:

Linda Kirk Fox, Dean, College of Family and Consumer Sciences, December 7, 2015 and updated Feb. 7, 2016