Apparel/Fabrics

Rust stains may be very difficult to remove. Do not use chlorine bleach on rust. Chlorine bleach will set these stains. If the garment's colorfastness is questionable, pretest the following rust removal products on a concealed area first.

  1. Sprinkle salt on the stain, squeeze lemon juice on it and spread in the sun to dry. Rinse thoroughly. Repeat if necessary.
  2. If it is safe to boil the fabric (generally some cottons and linens), boil stained article in a solution containing 4 teaspoons of cream of tartar to 1 pint of water. Boil until stain is removed. Rinse thoroughly.
  3. Apply a commercial rust remover carefully, following manufacturer's directions. Repeat process if necessary. Rust removers are available generally in appliance and hardware stores.

NOTE: For rusty discoloration on a load of white items, add detergent and one cup of oxygen bleach, and soak clothes for 10-15 minutes. Launder. A commercial color remover (available in grocery stores and drug stores) may also be used. For specialty fabrics (washable silk, washable wool, suede-like and silk-like fabrics), see index.

CAUTIONS:

  • Always read the care label before trying any stain removal method. Do not use any products or procedures prohibited by the care label.
  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination" of cleaning supplies are used.
  • Always pretest each cleaning agent on an inconspicuous area first to determine colorfastness.
  • Be sure to store and dispose of products/cans/containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children.
  • When using caustic or commercial cleaning solutions, be certain to provide for adequate ventilation.

Carpet

Blended Fibers, Fur, Hemp, Jute, Natural Fibers, Synthetic Fibers, Wool

  1. Mix a solution of 1 tablespoons oxalic acid and 1 cup of warm water. Apply the solution with a toothbrush, agitating lightly.
  2. If stain persists, let dry and repeat Method #1.
  3. If stain remains, try a commercial rust/iron remover.

CAUTIONS:

  • Always pretest each cleaning agent on an inconspicuous area first to determine colorfastness.
  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used.
  • Be sure to store and dispose of products/cans/containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children.
  • When using caustic, toxic, aromatic or flammable cleaning solutions, be certain to provide for adequate venti lation.
  • Oxalic acid is poisonous. Do not allow to touch skin. Wear rubber gloves.

Hard Surface Floors

Brick, Concrete, Stone/masonry (Except Marble)

Make a paste by combining 7 parts lint-free glycerin, 1 part sodium citrate crystals (available from drug store), 6 parts lukewarm water, and enough Whiting to create a thick paste. Apply this paste to the stain and allow to harden. Remove with a wooden scraper and repeat if necessary. Wash area thoroughly with clear water and allow to dry.

NOTE: The paste may be allowed to remain on the stain for several days, if necessary.

CAUTIONS:

  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used.
  • Be sure to store and dispose of products/cans/containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children.
  • When using caustic, toxic, aromatic or flammable cleaning solutions, be certain to provide for adequate ventilation.

Marble

  1. Rust stains on marble floors are commonly caused by contact with ferrous (iron/steel) objects or steel wool. Always use coasters under flower pots, lamp bases or any object that might stain the marble surface.
  2. Rub with a mild cleanser (such as baking soda) and a felt pad. Wash area thoroughly with clear water and wipe dry.
  3. If stain persists, make a paste of powdered Whiting or chalk dust mixed with a commercial liquid rust remover. Apply mixture to stain and cover with a plastic wrap, sealing with masking tape. Let stand for a few hours. Sponge off the mixture and buff the treated area.
  4. Rust stains may benefit from a follow-up treatment of a paste made from powdered Whiting or powdered chalk dust mixed with 6% hydrogen peroxide. Follow the same procedure as with the paste Method #2.

NOTE: Removing a rust stain from a marble surface may dull the surface. Wet the area with water and sprinkle with a marble polishing powder (tin-oxide). Rub with a thick, soft cloth or use an electric buffer.

CAUTIONS:

  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used.
  • Be sure to store and dispose of products/cans/containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children.
  • When using caustic, toxic, aromatic or flammable cleaning solutions, be certain to provide for adequate ventilation.

Resilient

Wipe the stain using a cloth or sponge dipped in warm, sudsy water. Rinse well and wipe dry. If any stain remains, use a commercial rust remover which is safe for resilient floors. Use according to the directions on the package label.

CAUTIONS:

  • Be careful not to spill commercial rust removers on porcelain or enamel finishes (like those on kitchen appliances) as these products can ruin the finish.
  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used.
  • Be sure to store and dispose of products/cans!containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children.
  • When using caustic, toxic, aromatic or flammable cleaning solutions, be certain to provide for adequate ventilation.

Tile

Rust stains on ceramic tile floors come from iron in the water supply, which can be removed permanently only by installation of an iron filter. Occasionally, iron is dissolved from rusting pipes or water mains by corrosive water.

  1. To treat fresh iron stains on ceramidplastic tile, use a heavy duty cleaning compound such as Spic 'n Span, which contains a large amount of Trisodium Phosphate (TSP). Apply the granular cleaner with a damp cloth or pad and rub the discolored surface until the stain is removed. Rinse thoroughly, wipe dry and polish with a dry cloth.
  2. Heavy, stubborn rust stains can often be removed by applying oxalic acid stain remover compounds such as Zud or a trichloro-melamine compound such as Barkeeper's Friend. Follow directions very carefully.
  3. For rust stains already set on ceramidplastic tile, dissolve oxalic acid crystals in hot water and enough Whiting or talcum powder to make a soft paste. Apply this poultice to the rust stain and let dry before removing. Rinse thoroughly and polish.

CAUTIONS:

  • Oxalic acid is poisonous. Do not allow to touch skin. Wear rubber gloves.
  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used.
  • Be sure to store and dispose of products!cans/containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children.
  • When using caustic, toxic, aromatic or flammable cleaning solutions, be certain to provide for adequate ventilation.

Furniture

Cast, Wrought Iron

There are several methods for removing rust from metal surfaces. The rusting of ferrous metals (iron, steel) occurs in the presence of moisture. A coat of paint prevents rust.

  1. Removal of the rust down to the bare metal is desirable. However, often this is difficult to accomplish. Sometimes deep pitting occurs. Using a wire brush, or a brush attachment on an electric drill, knock off as much of the rust as possible. Then sand down to bare metal with a medium-grit silicon carbide paper. Finish with fine sand paper or steel wool. Before painting, clean the surface with a paint thinner and apply a rust-resistant zinc chromate primer such as Rust-Oleum paint. It works well to inhibit further oxidation and provide a finish coating.
  2. On surfaces that are hard to sand, brush off as much rust as you can, than apply a commercial gel-like rust remover as directed. "Navel jelly" is one type of chemical gel sold in hardware stores. Coat the rusted parts and follow directions on container. Repeat the process if needed. When surface is totally dry, paint using a rust-resistant paint.

NOTE: There are chemical gels on the market that break down rust so it dries and hardens into a smooth protective base like a primer coating. Then the surface can be painted. Read all labels and precautions carefully.

CAUTIONS:

  • Always pretest each cleaning agent on an inconspicuous area first to determine colorfastness.
  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used.
  • Be sure to store and dispose of productslcans/containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children.
  • When using caustic, toxic, aromatic or flammable cleaning solutions, be certain to provide for adequate venti lation.

Marble

Rust stains on marble floors are commonly caused by contact with ferrous (iron/steel) objects or steel wool. Always use coasters under flower pots, lamp bases or any object that might stain the marble surface.

  1. Rub with a mild cleanser (such as baking soda) and a felt pad. Wash area thoroughly with clear water and wipe dry.
  2. If stain persists, make a paste of powdered Whiting and chalk dust mixed with a commerical liquid Rust Remover. Apply mixture to stain and cover with a plastic wrap, sealing with masking tape. Let stand for a few hours. Sponge off the mixture and buff the treated area.
  3. Rust stains may benefit for a follow-up treatment of a paste made from powdered Whiting or powdered chalk dust mixed with 6 percent hydrogen peroxide. Follow the same procedure as with the paste in #2.

NOTE: Removing a rust stain from a marble surface may dull the surface. Wet the area with water and sprinkle with a marble polishing powder (tin-oxide). Rub with a thick, soft cloth or use an electric buffer.

CAUTIONS:

  • Always pretest each cleaning agent on an inconspicuous area first to determine colorfastness.
  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used.
  • Be sure to store and dispose of products/cans/containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children.
  • When using caustic, toxic, aromatic or flammable cleaning solutions, be certain to provide for adequate ventilation.
  • Overwetting with water may cause the finish on the upholstery fabric to migrate and thus leave a circle in the treated area.

Upholstered Furniture

Leather

Iron and rust are chemical stains that should be treated by a professional cleaner. WALLS AND CEILINGS - PAPER (LEATHER, SUEDE) Iron and rust are chemical stains that should be treated by a professional cleaner.

Walls And Ceilings

Tile (Ceramic/plastic)

Rust stains on ceramidplastic bathroom/kitchen/laundry walls are usually caused by iron in the water supply, which can be removed permanently only by installation of an iron filter. Occasionally, iron is dissolved from rusting pipes or water mains by corrosive water.

  1. To treat fresh iron stains on tile walls in the bathroom/laundry, use a heavy duty cleaning compound such as Spic 'n Span which contains a large proportion of Trisodium Phosphate (TSP) . Apply this granular cleaner with a damp cloth or pad and rub the discolored surface until the stain is removed. Rinse thoroughly, wipe"dry and polish with a dry cloth.
  2. Heavy, stubborn rust stains can often be removed by applying oxalic acid stain remover compounds such as Zud or a trichloro-melamine compound such as Barkeeper's Friend. Follow directions very carefully.
  3. For rust stains already set on walls, dissolve oxalic acid crystals in hot water and enough Whiting or talcum powder to make a soft paste. Apply this poultice to the rust stain and let dry before removing. Rinse thoroughly and polish.
  4. A paste of borax and lemon juice is effective on iron stains. Rub the paste into the stain and allow it to dry. Rinse with clear water, then repeat if necessary. Rinse again and dry with a clean cloth.

CAUTIONS:

  • Oxalic acid is poisonous. Do not allow to touch skin. Wear rubber gloves.
  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used. 
  • Be sure to store and dispose of products/canslcontainers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children.
  • When using caustic, toxic, aromatic or flammable cleaning solutions, be certain to provide for adequate ventilation.
  • Do not use pumice stick on the ceramic glass found on cookware or ceramic cooktops. It will scratch the surface.

Metals

Cast/Wrought Iron

There are several methods for removing rust from metal surfaces. The rusting of ferrous metals (iron, steel) occurs in the presence of moisture. A coat of paint helps prevent rust.

  1. Removal of the rust down to the bare metal is desirable. However, often this is difficult to accomplish. Sometimes deep pitting occurs. Using a wire brush, or a brush attachment on an electric drill, knock off as much of the rust as possible. Then sand down to bare metal with a medium-grit silicon carbide paper. Finish with fine sand paper or steel wool. Before painting, clean the surface with a paint thinner and apply a rust-resistant zinc chromate primer such as Rust-Oleum paint. It works well to inhibit further oxidation and provide a finish coating.
  2. On surfaces that are hard to sand, brush off as much rust as you can, then apply a commercial gel-like rust remover as directed. Naval Jelly is one type of chemical gel sold in hardware stores. Coat rusted parts and allow to stand for at least 24 hours, then wash with warm water. Repeat the process it necessary. When the surface is totally dry, paint using a rust-resistant paint.

NOTE: There are chemical gels on the market that break down rust so that it dries and hardens into a smooth protective base like a primer coating. Then the surface can be painted. Read all labels and precautions carefully.

CAUTIONS:

  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used.
  • Be su'e to store and disp0se of prodl'ctslcanslcontainers as recommended. Keep our of reach of children.
  • When using caustic, toxic, aromatic or flammable cleaning solutions, be certain to provide for adequate ventilation.

Stainless Steel

Rub rust stain wiht a damp piece of very fine grade of emergy paper (can be purchased at hardware store, graded from coarse to fine), followed by rubbing the area with a slice of onion. Rinse well with hot water and dry thoroughly with a soft cloth.

Exterior Surfaces

Foundations

Brick

Brown staining on masonry surfaces is caused by the presence of soluble manganese or iron oxides. Many times these stains are brought on by the wrongful use of muriatic acid or compounds containing muriatic acid.

  1. If stains are light, Brick Klenz may take them off with little difficulty.
  2. If stains are new and light in color, mix 1 pound of oxalic acid in 1 gallon of water. Scrub with a stiff bristled brush.
  3. Many brown stains can be removed with Sure Klean Ferrous Stain Remover. Follow directions for use as given on label.
  4. If brown stains are heavy, dark and old, they can usually be removed successfully by mixing 1 part peracetic acid and 4 parts water. Brush or spray on the stained area. Allow to stand a few minutes (until reaction is complete) before rinsing area thoroughly with a hose. Allow wall area to dry 12·24 hours, then brush or spray a solution of 1 part Brick Klenz and 4 parts water to wall. Do not rinse off. This solution serves as a "neutralizing" material.

NOTE: The commercial products mentioned above can be purchased at a building supply company or at a local brick company.

CAUTIONS: 

  • Oxalic acid is poisonous. Avoid contact with skin. Wear rubber gloves.
  • Peracetic acid is a dangerous textile chemical that is sold by some textile chemical suppliers. When proper precautions are observed, the user should not be harmed. Workmen should protect eyes, hands, etc. when using peracetic and should not breathe the fumes.
  • Special care must be used in handling the container. Be sure to store and dispose of products/cans/containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children. 
  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used.

Porches, Decks, Patios:

Brick

Brown staining on masonry surfaces is caused by the presence of soliJble manganese or iron oxides. Many times these stains are brought on by the wrongful use of muriatic acid or compounds containing muriatic acid.

  1. If stains are light, Brick Klenz may take them off with little difficulty.
  2. If stains are new and light in color, mix 1 pound of oxalic acid in 1 gallon of water. Scrub with a stiff bristled brush.
  3. Many brown stains can be removed with Sure Klean Ferrous Stain Remover. Follow directions for use as given on label.
  4. If brown stains are heavy, dark and old, they can usually be removed successfully by mixing 1 part peracetic acid and 4 parts water. Brush or spray on the stained area. Allow to stand a few minutes (until reaction is complete) before rinsing area thoroughly with a.hose. Allow area to dry 12 - 24 hours, then brush or spray a solution of 1 part Brick Klenz and 4 parts water to surface. Do not rinse off. This solution serves as a "neutralizing" material.

NOTE: The commercial products mentioned above can be purchased at a building supply company or at a local brick company.

CAUTIONS:

  • Oxalic acid is poisonous. Avoid contact with skin. Wear rubber gloves.
  • Peracetic acid is a dangerous textile chemical that is sold by some textile chemical suppliers. When proper precautions are observed, the user should not be harmed. Workmen should protect eyes, hands, etc. when using peracetic and should not breathe the fumes.
  • Special care must be used in handling the container. Be sure to store and dispose of products/cans/containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children. 
  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used.

Wood (Stained)

Mix 1 part sodium citrate, 6 parts water and 7 parts glycerin. Mix this with Whiting to form a thick paste. Spread on the spot until it dries completely. Scrape off. Repeat the process as necessary.

CAUTIONS:

  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used. 
  • Be sure to store and dispose of products/cans/containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children.

Siding/walls

Brick, Brick Veneer

Brown staining on masonry surfaces is caused by the presence of soluble manganese or iron oxides. Many times these stains are brought on by the wrongful use of muriatic acid or compounds containing muriatic acid.

  1. If stains are light, Brick Klenz may take them off with little difficulty.
  2. If stains are new and light in color, mix 1 pound of oxalic acid in 1 gallon of water. Scrub with a stiff bristled brush.
  3. Many brown stains can be removed with Sure Klean Ferrous Stain Remover. Follow directions for use as given on label.
  4. If brown stains are heavy, dark and old, they can usually be removed successfully by mixing 1 part peracetic acid and 4 parts water. Brush or spray on the stained area. Allow to stand a few minutes (until reaction is complete) before rinsing area thoroughly with a hose. Allow wall area to dry 12 - 24 hours, then brush or spray a solution of 1 part Brick Klenz and 4 parts water to wall. Do not rinse off. This solution serves as a "neutralizing" material.

NOTE: The commercial products mentioned above can be purchased at a building supply company or at a local brick company.

CAUTIONS:

  • Oxalic acid is poisonous. Avoid contact with skin. Wear rubber gloves. 
  • Peracetic acid is a dangerous textile chemical that is sold by some textile chemical suppliers. When proper precautions are observed, the user should not be harmed. Workmen should protect eyes, hands, etc. when using peracetic and should not breathe the fumes. 
  • Special care must be used in handling the container. Be sure to store and dispose of products/canslcontainers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children. 
  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used.

Stucco

Dissolve 1 part of sodium citrate in 6 parts of water and 6 parts glycerin. Make a paste by mixing a portion of this liquid with powdered Whiting. Spread this over the stain in a thick layer. When dry, either moisten the present layer with the remaining liquid or replace it with fresh paste. Ordinarily it takes about a week to remove a rust stain.

CAUTIONS: 

  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used. 
  • Be sure to store and dispose of products/cans!containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children.

WOOD (STAINED, SHINGLES, SHAKES)

Mix 1 part sodium citrate, 6 parts water and 7 parts glycerin. Mix this with Whiting to form a thick paste. Spread on the spot until it dries completely. Scrape off. Repeat the process as necessary.

CAUTIONS: 

  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used. 
  • Be sure to store and dispose of products/cans!containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children.

Other/exterior

Awnings, Gutters, Flashing, Hardware (Metal)

There are several methods for removing rust from metal surfaces. The rusting of ferrous metals (iron, steel) occurs in the presence of moisture. A coat of paint prevents rust.

  1. Removal of the rust down to the bare metal is desirable. However, often this is difficult to accomplish. Sometimes deep pitting occurs. Using a wire brush, or a brush attachment on an electric drill, knock off as much of the rust as possible. Then sand down to bare metal with a medium-grit silicon carbide paper. Finish with fine sand paper or steel wool. Before painting, clean the surface with a paint thinner and apply a rust-resistant zinc chromate primer. Rust-Oleum paint works well to inhibit further oxidation and provide a finish coating.
  2. On surfaces that are hard to sand, brush off as much rust as you can, than apply a commercial gel-like rust remover as directed. Naval Jelly is one type of chemical gel sold in hardware stores. Coat the rusted parts and allow to stand for at least 24 hours, then wash with warm water. Repeat the process if necessary. When the surface is totally dry, paint using a rust-resistant paint.

NOTE: There are chemical gels on the market that break down rust so that it dries and hardens into a smooth protective base like a primer coating. Then the surface can be painted. Read all labels and precautions carefully.

CAUTIONS: 

  • Be careful any time a commercial product or combination of cleaning supplies are used. 
  • Be sure to store and dispose of products/cans/containers as recommended. Keep out of reach of children.