Click on the courses below to see course details.

Course ID: FDNS 2000. 1 hour.

Course Title: Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences

CourseDescription: The specialties and professions comprising the fields in family and consumer sciences. Systems perspective is emphasized in examining quality of life issues. Discussions include the personal, professional, and technical elements involved in career development.

Athena Title: INTRO FAM CON SCI

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 2000E or CHFD 2000, CHFD 2000E or HACE 2000, HACE 2000E or TXMI 2000, TXMI 2000E

Semester CourseOffered: Offered fall and spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:Understand the Family and Consumer Sciences profession and apply this understanding to their specialization; Communicate the integrative nature of the natural sciences, social sciences, art and business as the knowledge is applied to life issues for families and consumers.

Topical Outline: History and Philosophy of Family and Consumer Sciences Student Co-Curricular Opportunities Human Eco-Systems Professional Ethics Knowledge for Real Life: Outreach

Course ID: FDNS 2000E. 1 hour.


Course Title: Introduction to Family and Consumer Sciences

Course Description: The specialties and professions comprising the fields in family and consumer sciences. Systems perspective is emphasized in examining quality of life issues. Discussions include the personal, professional, and technical elements involved in career development.

Athena Title: INTRO FAM CON SCI

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 2000 or CHFD 2000, CHFD 2000E or TXMI 2000, TXMI 2000E or HACE 2000, HACE 2000E

Semester Course Offered: Offered every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives: Understand the Family and Consumer Sciences profession and apply this understanding to their specialization; Communicate the integrative nature of the natural sciences, social sciences, art and business as the knowledge is applied to life issues for families and consumers.


Topical Outline: History and Philosophy of Family and Consumer Sciences Student Co-Curricular Opportunities

       
Course ID: FDNS 2050. 3 hours.

Course Title: Introduction to Sport Nutrition and Wellness

Course Description: An introduction to healthy eating, active living, and human performance, with an emphasis on sport nutrition and wellness across the lifespan.

Athena Title: Intro to Sport Nutri and Welln

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 2100, FDNS 2100E, FDNS 2100H, FDNS 3000

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall and spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives: The course objectives are to prepare students from diverse backgrounds to understand basic introductory principles of how nutrition supports optimal health and human performance across the spectrum, with an emphasis on: i) dietary guidelines; ii) optimizing nutrient intake for various sports; iii) nutritional supplements/ergogenic aids; iv) manipulation of diet for body weight management; and v) eating disorders and obesity.

Topical Outline:

I. Evaluation of Nutrition Information
   A. Scientific Literature Pertaining to Nutrition
   B. Good Sources of Nutrition Information
II. Dietary Guidelines, MyPlate.gov, and Food Labels
   A. Planning Nutritious Diets
   B. Label Reading
III. Nutrient Intake for Various Sports
   A. Strength and Power
   B. Endurance
   C. Team
IV. Sport Foods (bars, gels, beverages, etc.)
V. Fluids and Electrolytes
   A. Sport Drinks
VI. Supplements and Ergogenic Aids
   A. Strength and Speed
   B. Endurance
   C. Evaluation, Labeling, Trusted Sources
   D. Vegetarian/Vegan Sources
VII. Nutrition for Physically Active Lifestyles
   A. Recommendations for Active Individuals
   B. Considerations for Nutrient and Fluid Intake in Training 
and Competition
VIII. Energy Balance and Weight Control
   A. Macronutrient (carbohydrate, fat, and protein) 
Utilization with Exercise
   B. Measurement of Energy Expenditure
   C. Weight Management
IX. Obesity and Eating Disorders
X. Fat Diets

 

   

Course ID: FDNS 2100. 3 hours.

Course Title: Human Nutrition and Food

Course Description: Nutritional needs and food choices for the optimal health of the individual during the life cycle.

Athena Title: HUMAN NUTR & FOOD

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives: Have a basic understanding of organic chemistry and physiology as applied to nutrients and nutrient metabolism. Have a basic knowledge of the factor affecting risk of chronic disease including family history, health behaviors and food intake.

Topical Outline: Dietary Guidelines and Dietary Planning Principals Digestion, Absorption and Metabolism of Macronutrients Functions and Requirements of Micronutrients Nutrition Throughout the Lifecycle Hunger and Global Environmental Problems

Course ID: FDNS 2100H. 3 hours.

Course Title: Human Nutrition and Food (Honors)

Course Description: Nutrition for honors students, including basic information about food and the nutrients it contains. Health topics with a nutrition component and the basic functions of macro and micronutrient will be covered.

Athena Title: HUMAN NUTR & FOOD H

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 2100, FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2220, FDNS 3000

Prerequisite: Permission of Honors

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives: Identify required nutrients Understand nutrient function Relate food intake to nutritional status Associate nutritional status with health status Acquire competence in using the large data bases available on the web

Topical Outline: Essential micronutrients, function and dietary sources Energy balance, body weight regulation, obesity Exercise in nutritional status Fads, facts, fallacies in nutrition Essential macronutrients and their metabolism Evaluation of diets and nutritional status

Honor Code Reference: Consistent with University Policy.

Course ID: FDNS 2100E. 3 hours.

Course Title: Human Nutrition and Food

Course Description: Nutritional needs and food choices for the optimal health of the individual during the life cycle.

Athena Title: HUMAN NUTR & FOOD

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000

Nontraditional Format: This course will be taught 95% or more online.

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives: Student will have a basic understanding of organic chemistry and physiology as applied to nutrients and nutrient metabolism. Student will have a basic knowledge of the factors affecting risk of chronic disease, including family history, health behaviors, and food intake.

Topical Outline:
Dietary Guidelines and Dietary Planning Principles
Digestion, Absorption, and Metabolism of Macronutrients
Functions and Requirements of Micronutrients Nutrition Throughout the Lifecycle
Hunger and Global Environmental Problems

Course ID: FDNS 2400. 1 hour.

Course Title: Introduction to Nutrition Science

Course Description: Orientation for new students in nutrition science. Problem-based discussions concerning the basic sciences relating to nutrition research.

Athena Title: INTRO NUTR SCI

Pre or Corequisite: FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.

Grading System: S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)

Course Objectives: amiliarize new students with faculty and research programs in the Department of Foods and Nutrition. Introduce students to the scientific method as applied to nutritional research.

Topical Outline:
Introduction to faculty and research programs in Foods and Nutrition

Introduction to the scientific method

Reading scientific research papers on selected current topics

Developing research projects at the University of Georgia

Styles of research from basic science to intervention and clinical work

Course ID: FDNS 2500. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 2 hours credit.

Course Title: Nutrition Outreach Internship

Course Description: Supervised experience in nutrition education involving the creation and implementation of campaigns promoting dietary guideline messages using a variety of communication strategies, including print, face-to-face interaction, and social media platforms.

Athena Title: Nutrition Outreach Internship

Nontraditional Format: Supervised practice experience only.


Prerequisite: (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2100E) and permission of department


Semester Course Offered: Offered fall and spring semester every year.


Grading System: S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)


Course Objectives: The student will: Provide targeted, specific nutrition education campaigns to the UGA community; Gain experience in collaborating with students from different academic backgrounds and nutrition professionals as part of a national nutrition education campaign; Gain experience identifying, researching, translating, and disseminating credible, evidence-based nutrition information in a way that is meaningful and actionable; Develop skills in professional health communication using multiple mediums including print, social media platforms, and face-to-face interactions; Develop skills such as public speaking, technical writing, teamwork, and personal creativity in an academic setting as students can act as role models for their peers in the UGA community.

Topical Outline:
Provide an applied, supervised practice experience as related to the practice of health and nutrition education using multiple communication platforms in a university setting;

Introduce students interested in nutrition education and health to the concepts of evidence-based research, needs assessment, behavior change theory, and using best practices in the context of designing and implementing public health campaigns for the UGA community;

Facilitate professional development in the areas of health and nutrition education;

Promote the development of communication skills within an interdisciplinary team;

Promote the development of skills used to translate evidence- based health and nutrition messages into targeted campaigns for the university community.

Course ID: FDNS 3000. 3 hours.

Course Title: Human Nutrition for Health Professionals

Course Description: Biochemical and physiological bases of human nutritional requirements and related metabolic and chronic diseases.

Athena Title: NUTR & HEALTH

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220

Prerequisite: (CHEM 1110 and CHEM 1110L and CHEM 2100 and CHEM 2100L) or (CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L and CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L)

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.
Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives: At an introductory level, have an understanding of nutrition principles including the roles, metabolism, requirements and sources of nutrients. At an introductory level, identify changes in nutrition requirements throughout the lifespan and during stress and exercise. At an introductory level, understand the biochemical and physiological bases of human nutritional requirements and related diseases. Knowledge of scientific methods and basic techniques used in nutrition research. Knowledge of basic factors contributing to the risk of chronic disease including family history, health behaviors, and food intake.

Topical Outline:
Topics include among others:

Digestion, absorption and transport of nutrients: common digestive problems.

Carbohydrates and Diabetes.

Energy balance and body compostion: Obesity and eating disorders.

Fat soluble Vitamins:Vitamin D regulation of serum calcium.

Water and minerals: Mechanism of iron absorption.

Nutrition and cardiovascular diseases: The metabolic syndrome.

Nutrition requirements throughout the lifespan and during stress and exercise.

Course ID: FDNS 3010. 1-12 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit.

Course Title: Special Problems in Foods and Nutrition

Course Description: Designed to permit independent study and research.


Athena Title: SPEC PROB IN FDN

Nontraditional Format: Directed study.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

Directed reading, research, and/or community-based learning experience under the direction of a FDNS faculty member. Student and supervising faculty member will contract for topic, description of duties, expected learning outcomes, and evaluation.

Topical Outline:

Topics will be determined from consultation between student and supervising faculty member.

Course ID: FDNS 3100. 3 hours.

Course Title: Macronutrients and Energy Balance

Course Description: Human nutrition related to carbohydrates, lipids, protein, and energy with special emphasis on diet and performance under varying conditions of health. Topics include food sources, biochemical functions, and metabolism.

Athena Title: MACRONUTR ENERGY

Prerequisite: [(BIOL 1103 and 1103L) or (BIOL 1107 and BIOL 1107L)] and (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000) and (CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L)

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives: Introduce students to the elements of macronutrient metabolism. Familiarize students with effects of nutrients on human metabolism and health outcomes.

Topical Outline:

  • Carbohydrate-containing foods including chemistry and metabolism
  • Protein-containing foods including chemistry, metabolism and effects on the body
  • Lipid-containing foods including chemistry and metabolism
  • Energy balance and energy metabolism relative to obesity
  • Impact of lifestyle choices on utilization of nutrients

Course ID: FDNS 3600. 3 hours.

Course Title: Food Principles

Course Description: Food selection, preparation, evaluation, and composition.

Athena Title: FOOD PRINCIPLES

Prerequisite: (CHEM 1110 and CHEM 1110L) or (CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L)

Corequisite: FDNS 3600L

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

  • To understand food preparation techniques
  • To understand basic concepts of food preparation
  • To know the terminology associated with food preparation
  • To investigate basic changes that occur during food preparation
  • To understand how each ingredient functions in a food product
  • To be able to identify and evaluate food products
  • To understand the principles of food preservation
  • To learn technical writing skills
  • To improve basic computer skills

Topical Outline:

  • Introduction to 3600
  • Laboratory Procedures
  • Food Composition
  • Starches and Cereals
  • Heating Methods
  • Fruits and Vegetables
  • Food Safety (Sanitation)
  • Fats, Emulsions, and Salads
  • Milk and Cheese
  • Eggs
  • Batters and Doughs
  • Red Meat
  • Food Preservation
  • Poultry and Fish
  • Meat Alternatives

Course ID: FDNS 3600L. 1 hour. 3 hours lab per week.

Course Title: Food Principles Laboratory

Course Description: Food selection, preparation, evaluation, and composition.

Athena Title: FOOD PRINCIPLES LAB

Prerequisite: (CHEM 1110 and CHEM 1110L) or (CHEM 1211 and CHEM 1211L)
Corequisite: FDNS 3600

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

  • To understand food preparation techniques
  • To understand basic concepts of food preparation
  • To know the terminology associated with food preparation
  • To investigate basic changes that occur during food preparation
  • To understand how each ingredient functions in a food product
  • To be able to identify and evaluate food products
  • To understand the principles of food preservation
  • To learn technical writing skills
  • To improve basic computer skills

Topical Outline:

  • Introduction to 3600
  • Laboratory Procedures
  • Food Composition
  • Starches and Cereals
  • Heating Methods
  • Fruits and Vegetables
  • Food Safety (Sanitation)
  • Fats, Emulsions, and Salads
  • Milk and Cheese
  • Eggs
  • Batters and Doughs
  • Red Meat
  • Food Preservation
  • Poultry and Fish
  • Meat Alternatives

Course ID: FDNS 3610. 3 hours.

Course Title: Quantity Food Production

Course Description: Principles of food preparation in large quantities; institutional equipment and procedures.

Athena Title: QUANT FOODS

Prerequisite: FDNS 3600-3600L
Corequisite: FDNS 3610L

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

  • To recognize and evaluate the physical layout and organization of an institutional kitchen.To recognize and evaluate the organization of personnel in foodservice and healthcare facilities.
  • To understand the need for a safe, sanitary environment and identify good and bad safety and sanitary practices.
  • To plan and evaluate simple menus for a foodservice operation.
  • To identify and use basic equipment used in an institutional foodservice.
  • To use basic cost control procedures, including calculations related to cost control.
  • To recognize and evaluate factors and skills involved in efficient food production.
  • To identify factors relating to the serving of quality food.
  • To become familiar with some management tools and techniques, including calculations used in foodservice operations.
  • To develop team work skills.
  • To use computers and relevant software to facilitate planning and decision-making in foodservice operations.
  • To develop technical writing skills.

Topical Outline:

  • Organization: Personnel, Physical Layout, and Food Flow.
  • Computer Applications in Foodservice: eLC, PowerPoint, word processing and grammar check programs; Food-Trak (a foodservice inventory accounting program); Page Composer and Web site construction in eLC.
  • Introduction to Food for Fifty Tables: Practice Production Problems.
  • Storerooms and Inventory: Introduction to Yield, Storeroom and Inventory Terminology.
  • Equipment Use.
  • Recipe Conversion, Standardization, and Costing.
  • Chemical Safety and UGA Food Service Computer Functions.
  • Sanitation: Introduction to HACCP.
  • Work Simplification: Process Chart Simulation; Time and Motion Simulation.
  • Production Principles: Production Scheduling
  • Soups, Stocks, Sauces.
  • Salads, Presentation Principles.

Course ID: FDNS 3610L . 1 hour. 3 hours lab per week.

Course Title: Quantity Foods Laboratory

Course Description: Principles of food preparation in large quantities; institutional equipment and procedures.

Athena Title: QUANT FOODS

Prerequisite: FDNS 3600-3600L
Corequisite: FDNS 3610

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

  • To recognize and evaluate the physical layout and organization of an institutional kitchen.To recognize and evaluate the organization of personnel in foodservice and healthcare facilities.
  • To understand the need for a safe, sanitary environment and identify good and bad safety and sanitary practices.
  • To plan and evaluate simple menus for a foodservice operation.
  • To identify and use basic equipment used in an institutional foodservice.
  • To use basic cost control procedures, including calculations related to cost control.
  • To recognize and evaluate factors and skills involved in efficient food production.
  • To identify factors relating to the serving of quality food.
  • To become familiar with some management tools and techniques, including calculations used in foodservice operations.
  • To develop team work skills.
  • To use computers and relevant software to facilitate planning and decision-making in foodservice operations.
  • To develop technical writing skills.

Topical Outline:

  • Organization: Personnel, Physical Layout, and Food Flow.
  • Computer Applications in Foodservice: eLC, PowerPoint, word processing and grammar check programs; Food-Trak (a foodservice inventory accounting program); Page Composer and Web site construction in eLC.
  • Introduction to Food for Fifty Tables: Practice Production Problems.
  • Storerooms and Inventory: Introduction to Yield, Storeroom and Inventory Terminology.
  • Equipment Use.
  • Recipe Conversion, Standardization, and Costing.
  • Chemical Safety and UGA Food Service Computer Functions.
  • Sanitation: Introduction to HACCP.
  • Work Simplification: Process Chart Simulation; Time and Motion Simulation.
  • Production Principles: Production Scheduling
  • Soups, Stocks, Sauces.
  • Salads, Presentation Principles.

Course ID: FDNS 4050/6050. 3 hours.

Course Title: Optimal Nutrition for the Life Span

Course Description: Nutritional needs of infants, young children, adolescents, pregnant and lactating women, and middle-aged and elderly people.

Athena Title: NUTR LIFE SPAN

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 4050E/6050E or FDNS 4510/6510

Prerequisite: FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

  • To increase your understanding and knowledge of the stages in the human lifecycle.
  • To increase your understanding and knowledge of the nutritional needs associated with each stage of the lifecycle and what makes each stage unique.

Topical Outline:

  • Review of macro and micronutrients, dietary assessment
  • Physiology and nutritional needs during pregnancy and lactation
  • Physiology and nutritional needs during infancy
  • Physiology and nutritional needs during childhood and adolescence
  • Physiology and nutritional needs during adulthood and elderly

Course ID: FDNS 4050E/6050E. 3 hours.

Course Title: Optimal Nutrition for the Life Span

Course Description: Nutritional needs of infants, young children, adolescents, pregnant and lactating women, and middle-aged and elderly people.

Athena Title: NUTR LIFE SPAN


Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 4050/6050 or FDNS 4510/6510

Nontraditional Format: This course will be taught 95% or more online.

Prerequisite: FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

  • To increase understanding and knowledge of the stages in the human lifecycle.
  • To increase understanding and knowledge of the nutritional needs associated with each stage of the lifecycle and what makes each stage unique.

Topical Outline:

  • Review of macro and micronutrients, dietary assessment
  • Physiology and nutritional needs during pregnancy and lactation
  • Physiology and nutritional needs during infancy
  • Physiology and nutritional needs during childhood and adolescence
  • Physiology and nutritional needs during adulthood and elderly

Course ID: FDNS 4070/6070. 1 hour.

Course Title: Research Methodology in Human Foods and Nutrition

Course Description: Basics of foods and nutrition research methodology. Critical reading and evaluation of the foods and nutrition literature using the evidence-based guidelines and protocols. Application of research findings to dietetic practice.

Athena Title: RESEARCH METHODS

Pre or Corequisite: [(BIOL 1103 and BIOL 1103L) or (BIOL 1107 and 1107L)] and (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000) and (CHEM 1212 and CHEM 1212L)

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall and spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand the basics of research design and statistical analysis used in foods and nutrition research.
  2. Conduct descriptive statistical analyses using Microsoft Excel program.
  3. Locate current foods and nutrition literature and evidence-based guidelines and protocols.
  4. Interpret new scientific findings using the evidence-based guidelines and protocols.
  5. Incorporate the basics of research design and descriptive statistical analysis in developing and evaluating a client/patient care plan.

Outline

  1. Basics of research I: What is research?
  2. Basics of research II: Research design
  3. How to locate foods and nutrition literature
  4. Basics of research III: Statistical analysis
  5. How to locate evidence-based guidelines and protocols
  6. How to use MS Excel program for descriptive statistical analysis
  7. Reading and discussion- Observational study I
  8. Reading and discussion- Observational study II
  9. Reading and discussion- Case control study I
  10. Reading and discussion- Case control study II
  11. Reading and discussion- Intervention study I
  12. Reading and discussion- Intervention study II
  13. Reading and discussion- Intervention study III
  14. Reading and discussion- Laboratory study

Course ID: FDNS 4100/6100. 3 hours.

Course Title: Micronutrient Nutrition

Course Description: Human needs for vitamins, minerals, and electrolytes with emphasis on biochemistry, physiology, epidemiology, food sources, and their role in performance under varying conditions of age and health.

Athena Title: MICRONUTRIENTS

Prerequisite: FDNS 3100
Pre or Corequisite: (BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100 or BCMB 40106010) and [(CBIO 2200-2200L and CBIO 2210-2210L) or VPHY 3100]

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

Introduce students to the elements of micronutrient metabolism. Familiarize students with effects of vitamins and minerals on human metabolism and health outcomes.

Topical Outline:

  • Electrolyte physiology and metabolism Vitamin physiology, biochemistry, and metabolism
  • Macromineral physiology and roles in human metabolism and disease
  • Trace element physiology and roles in human metabolism and disease

Course ID: FDNS(KINS) 4220/6220. 3 hours.

Course Title: Nutrition in Physical Activity, Exercise, and Sport

Course Description: Role of nutrition in supporting health and human performance with an emphasis on macronutrients, micronutrients, nutrient bioenergetics, optimizing nutrient and food intake, thermoregulation, fluid balance, supplements, ergogenic aids, and body weight management.

Athena Title: Nutri Phys Activity Exer Sport

Prerequisite: (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 3000) or (KINS 3700 or KINS 4630/6630) or permission of department

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

The course objectives are to prepare students from diverse backgrounds in kinesiology, foods and nutrition, and related fields to understand basic principles of how nutrition supports optimal health and human performance for competitive athletes, recreational athletes, or individuals engaged in physical activity and exercise to improve health and fitness, with an emphasis on 

  1. utilization of macronutrients, micronutrients, and water;
  2. nutrient bioenergetics; 
  3. optimizing nutrient intake;
  4. thermoregulation and fluid balance;
  5. foods, supplements and ergogenic aids; and
  6. body weight management.

Topical Outline:

  1. Nutrition for optimal health and human performance
    • Macronutrients: carbohydrates, lipids, protein
    • Micronutrients and water
    • Food digestion and absorption
  2. Nutrient bioenergetics in exercise and training
    • Bioenergetics
    • Macronutrient utilization with exercise 
    • Measurement of energy expenditure 
  3. Optimizing nutrient intake to maximize health and performance
    • Recommendations for active individuals
    • Considerations for nutrient intake in training and competition
    • Food marketing and selection
  4. Thermoregulation and fluid balance during exercise
    • Temperature regulation
    • Fluid replacement
  5. Food, supplements and purported ergogenic aids (pharmacologic and nutritional)
    • Strength and speed
    • Endurance performance
  6. Diet, body composition, healthy weight management, eating disorders
  7. Sports medicine team

Course ID: FDNS 4240/6240. 3 hours.

Course Title: Nutrition and Obesity Across the Lifespan

Course Description: Role of energy intake, macronutrients, and micronutrients in obesity prevention and management throughout life, including during the preconceptual period, pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, middle-age, and the older adult years. Emphasis on evidence-based strategies for the general public and health practitioners to improve nutrition and prevent and manage obesity.

Athena Title: NUTROBESITYLIFESPAN

Prerequisite: FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives: Objectives are to 1) understand the role of energy intake, macronutrients, and micronutrients in obesity prevention and management throughout life, including during the preconceptual period, pregnancy, lactation, childhood, adolescence, middle- age, and the older adult years, and 2) identify practical and evidence-based ways for the general public and health practitioners to prevent and manage obesity safely and effectively in a variety of settings.

Topical Outline:

  • 1) Demographics of obesity
    • a) Assessment of overweight and obesity
    • b) Time trends for prevalence of overweight and obesity across the lifespan
    • c) Time trends for changes in food and energy intake and obesity prevalence
  • 2) Theories of the regulation of energy intake and expenditure
    • a) Calorie balance, energy intake and energy expenditure
    • b) Macronutrients in body weight regulation
    • c) Micronutrients in body weight regulation
    • d) Diet-related satiety factors (macronutrient distribution, volumetrics, energy density)
    • e) Factors affecting food choice
  • 3) Risk factors and consequences of obesity during
    • a) Pre-pregnancy, pregnancy, lactation
    • b) Infancy, childhood, adolescence
    • c) Adulthood
    • d) Older adult years
  • 4) Prevention and management of obesity – policy, environmental and community factors that influence food and energy intake
    • a) Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DHHS, USDA), front-of- package nutrition rating systems (IOM), food marketing and the diets of children and youth (IOM), food and nutrition assistance programs (Women Infant and Children, Food Stamps/Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs, USDA)
    • b) Food and nutrition labeling, nutrition social marketing
    • c) Food and beverage environments (food stores, fast food, restaurants, food deserts, food advertising)
    • d) School food and nutrition (e.g., school breakfast, school lunch, school gardens, locally grown initiatives)
    • e) Day care and pre-schools
    • f) Work environments
    • g) Healthcare systems
    • h) Community-based programs for older adults (e.g., Senior Centers)
    • i) Integrating nutrition and physical activity into community- based prevention programs
  • 5) Management of obesity – individual factors related to food and energy intake
    • a) Factors affecting weight loss success (National Weight Control Registry)
    • b) Bariatric surgery
    • c) Pharmacology (diet “pills,” prescription, and non- prescription)
    • d) Dietary modification (meal patterns and portion control, use of meal replacements (e.g., Slimfast), macronutrient distribution)
    • e) Theories of behavior management
    • f) Strategies used to promote behavior change (i.e. goal setting, motivational interviewing)
    • g) Role of dietitian and other health practitioners in obesity management and weight loss counseling
  • 6) Obesity prevention and management strategies throughout life
    • a) Health belief theories
    • b) Nutrition assessment (food intake, energy intake, body weight, BMI)
    • c) Practical and evidence-based ways for individuals, families, schools, worksites, and communities to control energy intake and improve energy expenditure
    • d) Examples of successful programs across the lifespan (pre- pregnancy, pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood and adolescence, adulthood, older adults)
       

Course ID: FDNS 4500/6500. 3 hours.

Course Title: Medical Nutrition Therapy I

Course Description: Nutrition practice in the clinical setting using the nutrition care process. Emphasis on enteral and parenteral nutrition, gastrointestinal disease.

Athena Title: MED NUTR THERAPY I

Undergraduate Pre or Corequisite: FDNS 4100/6100

Graduate Pre or Corequisite: FDNS 4100/6100 or FDNS 6400

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

Following completion of the course, the student:

Will describe the nutrition care process and will demonstrate the ability to: 

  1. conduct a nutrition screening and assessment;
  2. interpret dietary intake, body composition, laboratory values, medical history and socioeconomic factors;
  3. select an appropriate nutrition diagnosis;
  4. plan intervention, monitoring and evaluation; and
  5. use appropriate methods of documentation.Case studies will be used to evaluate this objective.

Will be able to describe health care delivery systems in acute and long-term care facilities and discuss the role of the dietitian and of other health care team members in these systems.

Will demonstrate knowledge of pathophysiology and medical nutrition therapy for various disease states.

Will be able to discuss indications for use of enteral and parenteral nutrition, describe enteral formulas, and accurately calculate enteral and parenteral formulations for patient case scenarios.

Topical Outline:

  • Health Care Systems: Role of the dietitian in the health care team
  1. the health care and dietetic teams
  2. professional organizations
  3. registration and licensing
  • Nutrition Care Process: Nutrition Screening & Assessment
  1. medical and social histories, functional status
  2. dietary intake assessment
  3. anthropometric measurements
  4. laboratory parameters
  5. nutritionally focused physical assessment
  6. drug-nutrient interactions
  • Nutrition Care Process: Nutrition Diagnosis, Intervention and Monitoring/Evaluation Using Evidence-based Guidelines
  • Nutrition Care Documentation
  • Medical nutrition therapy for diseases of the gastrointestinal tract
  • Bone health
  • Introduction to enteral and parenteral nutrition

Course ID: FDNS 4510/6510. 3 hours.

Course Title: Nutrition Related to the Human Life Cycle

Course Description: Nutritional health needs related to specific stages of the human life cycle. Special emphasis will be given to physiological changes and nutrition needs during pregnancy, lactation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood.

Athena Title: LIFECYCLE NUTR

Prerequisite: FDNS 3100

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

  • To increase your understanding and knowledge of the stages and physiological changes in the human lifecycle.
  • To increase your understanding and knowledge of the nutritional needs associated with each stage of the lifecycle and what makes each stage unique.
  • To be able to assess nutritional needs of clients from different age groups and make the appropriate nutrition recommendation.
  • To be able to apply this knowledge through the use of applicable case studies.
  • To become familiar with the scientific literature related to nutritional needs during the human life cycle.
  • To increase the use of electronic media as a resource tool to enhance the understanding of lifecycle nutrition.

Topical Outline:

  • Maternal and infant health
  • Nutrition, fertility and family planning
  • Physiology of pregnancy
  • Nutritional needs during pregnancy
  • Lifestyle concerns
  • Nutritional assessment
  • Management of pregnancy complications
  • Pregnant adolescent
  • Anatomy and physiology of lactation
  • Promotion and support of breastfeeding
  • Growth and development
  • Nutrition needs of infants and children
  • Assessment of food intake
  • Low birth weight
  • Food patterns in young children
  • Factors shaping food patterns
  • Childhood obesity
  • Nutrition for preschool and school age children
  • Nutrition for adolescence
  • Eating disorders
  • Adolescent athlete
  • Aging Population trends, theories of aging
  • Longitudinal studies of aging
  • Physiological changes with aging
  • Vitamins and minerals in aging
  • Food selection patterns
  • Nutritional problems with aging

Course ID: FDNS 4520/6520. 2 hours.

Course Title: Clinical Nutrition Interventions

Course Description: Specialized nutrition practice in the clinical setting including nutrition assessment, enteral and parenteral nutrition, and nutrition care documentation.

Athena Title: CLIN NUTR INTERVENT

Corequisite: FDNS 4530/6530

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

Using professional literature, evidence-based guidelines, and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) students will:

  • demonstrate the ability to conduct nutrition assessment and select appropriate nutrition diagnosis, nutrition intervention, and monitoring and evaluation criteria for various disease states. Case studies will be used to evaluate this objective.
  • be able to define and correctly use common medical terms in case studies and on examinations.
  • be able to demonstrate counseling techniques to facilitate behavior change.
  • be able to discuss principles, procedures and typical outcome measures used in quality assurance programs for nutrition care delivery. Students will use informatics principles and analyze and evaluate data to use in decision making.
  • be able to describe health care delivery systems, the role of the dietitian and of other health care team members in these systems.
  • be able to define terminology used to describe nutrition service payment systems, and be able to discuss current reimbursement issues.
  • be able to apply dietetics Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) to a clinical professional practice scenario.
  • be able to describe how to keep abreast of pending legislation on nutrition care services delivery and reimbursement issues, and will be able to define at least one law or regulation affecting nutrition care services delivery.

Topical Outline:

  • Parenteral Nutrition
    • Calculations
    • Complications
    • Role of RN and PharmD in parenteral nutrition, speakers, RD, RN and PharmD
  • Dysphagia
    • Speaker:
      • Speech-Language Pathologist
      • Evaluation of Dysphagia (speaker)
      • Dietary treatment of dysphagia
  • Nutrition Counseling: Theories and Techniques
  • Quality Assurance for Nutrition Care Services
  • Health Care Reimbursement Issues

Course ID: FDNS 4530/6530. 4 hours.

Course Title: Medical Nutrition Therapy II

Course Description: Diet modifications for disease prevention and treatment. Special emphasis is given to the study of metabolic, cardiovascular, and renal disorders.

Athena Title: MED NUTR THERAPY II

Prerequisite: FDNS 4100/6100

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

Following the completion of this course, the student will:

  • show a working knowledge of pathophysiology, abnormal biochemistry, and altered nutrient metabolism in various disease states. Students will demonstrate the ability to use appropriate medical terminology when discussing various disease states.
  • know and understand disease prevention guidelines for the major chronic diseases.
  • know and be able to discuss the principles of nutrition screening, assessment, intervention, and monitoring evaluation for various disease states. Medical nutrition therapy knowledge will include knowledge of how nutrient, fluid, electrolyte needs and feeding techniques are altered for each disease state.
  • be able to develop nutrition care plans and define dietary modifications that are medically, culturally and aesthetically acceptable for individuals with various disease states.
  • be knowledgeable about health behaviors exhibited by clients, and their typical educational needs.
  • demonstrate the ability to use the nutrition care process and develop a nutrition care plan by accurately completing case studies.
  • demonstrate the ability to use current information technologies to locate professional research literature and evidence-based guidelines related to medical nutrition therapy. Students will demonstrate the ability to interpret research literature to make evidence-based practice decisions when completing case studies.
  • enhance computer communication skills through the use of eLC.

Topical Outline:

  • Weight management
  • Nutrition for exercise and sports
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Hypertension
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Pulmonary disease
  • Hypermetabolic stress: Sepsis, trauma, burns & surgery
  • Nutrition & cancer
  • Renal disease
  • Diseases of nervous system
  • Inborn errors of metabolism
  • HIV infection and AIDS

Course ID: FDNS 4540/6540. 3 hours.

Course Title: Public Health Dietetics

Course Description: Nutrition in public health care and tools for successful management and delivery of nutrition services, including knowledge of community assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation as related to nutritional care.

Athena Title: PUBL HLTH DIETETICS

Prerequisite: FDNS 4050/6050 or FDNS 4510/6510

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

  • To relate the social, economic, psychological, behavioral and environmental factors to food availability and the health and nutritional status of populations.
  • To recognize population groups at-risk and those with special needs.
  • To understand the role and skills needed to work with diverse population groups.
  • To define the roles and responsibilities of a public health nutritionist.
  • To identify the components of successful delivery of quality nutrition services.
  • To discuss public health programs and policies involved in the delivery of nutrition care for individuals throughout the life cycle.
  • To learn effective nutrition interviewing and counseling strategies, demonstrate counseling skills and document and effective nutrition plan.
  • To learn how to conduct a community nutrition assessment.
  • To understand the role of the nutrition manager and components of successful nutrition services management.
  • To understand public policy and legislation influencing nutrition programs and practice and how to shape that policy.
  • To identify current known relationships between diet/health behavior and chronic disease, and health promotion and disease prevention theories and recommendations.
  • To understand the importance of networking and working in groups for facilitating communication of nutrition programs.
  • To discuss and demonstrate basic nutrition screening and nutrition assessment techniques used in community health settings through use of case studies and role playing.
  • To learn techniques for assessing vital signs of clients and to demonstrate the use of these techniques in the classroom.
  • To summarize educational theory and techniques and apply these theories to the development of educational materials and to presentations of an educational session.
  • To understand the role of other allied health professionals and how these professionals interact with dietitians in interdisciplinary care of clients.

Topical Outline:

  • Opportunities in Community Nutrition
  • Policy Making
  • The Health Care Industry
  • Nutrition Policy and Monitoring
  • Community Assessment
  • Program Planning
  • Designing Community Interventions
  • Nutrition Education
  • Marketing Nutrition Programs
  • Program Management and Grant Writing
  • Community Nutrition in the Life Cycle
  • Domestic Hunger and Food Assistance Programs

Course ID: FDNS 4560/6560. 3 hours.

Course Title: Nutrition, Health, and Aging

Coures Description: Foods and nutrients in the health and well-being of the elderly; effects of aging on macro and micronutrient needs; influence of disease, medications, economics, and culture; nutritional assessment, support, and services; health promotion and disease prevention; future directions for research.

Athena Title: NUTRITION AGING

Prerequisite: (FDNS 3100 or FDNS 4050/6050) and (CBIO 2210-2210L or VPHY 3100)

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

  • Identify the needs for nutrition assessment and intervention across the continuum of care for various subgroups of older adults: healthy community dwelling, frail home-bound, assisted living, and nursing home.
  • Understand the role of the aging process on the metabolism of macro and micro-nutrients.
  • Understand the role of nutrition in prevention and management of chronic health problems in older adults (e.g., cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, stroke, diabetes, cancer, osteoporosis, and cognitive impairment).
  • Recognize the influence of disease processes and medications on nutritional status in the aged.
  • Understand the role of socio-demographic factors such as social isolation, poverty, economic uncertainty, food insecurity, and culture on nutritional status of older adults.
  • Learn nutritional assessment and support services procedures for older adults.
  • Become skilled in the role of health promotion in disease prevention for the older adults.
  • Know the relationships among appropriate nutrition services, positive health outcomes, and reduced health care costs of older adults.
  • Develop nutrition education programs targeted to specific subgroups of the older adults.
  • Develop oral presentation skills related to nutrition and aging.
  • Identify areas of nutrition research that will increase the quality of life for older adults.

Topical Outline:

  • Nutrition assessment and intervention for various subgroups of older adults.
  • Role of the aging process on the metabolism of macro and micro-nutrients.
  • Influence of disease processes and medications on nutritional status in the aged.
  • Role of sociodemographic factors on nutritional status of older adults.
  • Nutritional assessment and support services for older adults.
  • Role of nutrition in health promotion and disease prevention for older adults.
  • Relationships of nutrition and health care costs for older adults.
  • Nutrition education programs for subgroups of older adults.
  • Effective communication with older adults.
  • Research needs for nutrition and quality of life for older adults.

Course ID: FDNS 4570/6570. 3 hours.

Course Title: Nutritional Genetics

Course Description: The role of genetic variation in regulating nutrient status and metabolism and how these relationships affect the risk and progression of disease.

Athena Title: NUTR GENETICS

Undergraduate Prerequisite: FDNS 3100 or BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100 or BCMB 4010/6010 or permission of department
Graduate Prerequisite: FDNS 6400 or permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

The course objectives are to prepare students from diverse backgrounds in foods and nutrition and related fields to understand basic principles of how genetic variation regulates nutrient status and metabolism, as well as how these relationships affect disease, with an emphasis on

  1. molecular nutritional genetics;
  2. inheritance of nutritional and metabolic diseases;
  3. the study of nutritional and metabolic diseases in humans;
  4. mapping nutritional phenotypes in model organisms; and
  5. nutritional epigenetics.

Topical Outline:

  1. Molecular Nutritional Genetics
    • Molecular Structure and Chromosomal Arrangement of DNA
    • Gene Transcription and Translation
    • Nutritional Regulation of Gene Expression
  2. Inheritance of Nutritional and Metabolic Diseases
    • Mendelian Inheritance
    • Crossing-over and Recombination
    • Linkage and Genetic Mapping
  3. The Study of Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases in Humans
    • Finding the Genetic Origin of Disease in Humans, Effects on Medical Treatment.
    • Quantitative Traits
    • Population Genetics
  4. Mapping Nutritional Phenotypes in Mice and Other Model Organisms
    • Finding Your Gene: Mapping Quantitative Traits
    • Confirming Your Gene: Knock-out Models and Their Roles in Nutrition Science
    • Moving from Animals to Humans
  5. Non-mendelian Inheritance: Nutritional Epigenetics
    • Overview
    • Epigenetic Regulation of Metabolism and Obesity
    • Epigenetic Regulation of Nutrient Status

Course ID: FDNS 4580. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit.

Course Title: Undergraduate Special Topics in Foods and Nutrition

Course Description: Selected topics from the field of foods and nutrition.

Athena Title: TOPICS FOOD NUTR

Nontraditional Format: Students will meet with faculty members on a regular basis.

Prerequisite: FDNS 3100 or FDNS 4050/6050

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall and spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

Study in depth at least one topic in the area of foods and nutrition. Write a report on at least one topic in the area of foods and nutrition.

Course Outline:

  • Choosing an area to study
  • Identifying references related to chosen area
  • Organizing a paper
  • Writing a paper based on references identified
  • Edit paper after it has been critiqued by faculty advisor

Course ID: FDNS 4590/6590. 3 hours.

Course Title: Metabolism and Physiology of Energy Balance and Obesity

Course Description: The mechanisms involved in regulating food intake and energy balance. Nutritional, endocrine, genetic, and epigenetic processes and their impact on obesity will be covered. Specific attention will be given to human obesity.

Athena Title: Metab and Physio Ener Bal Obes
Undergraduate Prerequisite: FDNS 3100 or permission of department
Graduate Prerequisite: FDNS 6400 or permission of department
Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.
Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

Students will learn the different processes involved in regulating body weight, understand the complexity and redundancy of energy homeostasis control, and be aware of the different challenges posed by obesity. Students will develop their academic and professional toolkit, which includes critical reading and writing and presentation skills.

Topical Outline:

  • Obesity definition and demographic worldwide and in the U.S. Health implications of obesity, consequences of excessive body weight, and chronic conditions
  • Regulatory mechanism of macronutrient homeostasis
  • Regulation of meal size, gut-brain axis, and GI originating signals (including taste)
  • Reward system, emotional eating, and food addiction
  • Adipose tissue biology, leptin and adiponectin, inflammation, and brown adipose tissue
  • Biochemistry of endocrine factors, interaction long- and short- term signals, circadian cycle
  • Regulatory genes and epigenetic factors
  • Exercise and energy balance
  • Obesity and immune system, chronic inflammation
  • The role of the microflora
  • The challenge of childhood obesity
  • Pharmacological and surgical treatment of obesity
     

Course ID: FDNS 4600/6600. 3 hours.

Course Title: Food and Nutrition Policy

Course Description: Health, safety, and policy issues related to food consumption trends; nutrient composition of foods, food additives, food allergies and hypersensitivities, naturally occurring toxins, pathogens, pesticides, biotechnology-derived foods, irradiated foods, and food laws and regulations.

Athena Title: FOOD NUTR POLICY

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 4600E or FDNS 6600E

Prerequisite: (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000) or (FDNS 3600 and FDNS 3600L)

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

  • Understand the interrelationships among health, safety, and policy issues concerning food consumption trends, nutrient composition of foods, food labeling, food additives, food allergies and hypersensitivities, phytochemicals, naturally occurring toxins, pathogens, pesticides, biotechnology-derived foods, irradiated foods, and food laws and regulations.
  • Through written examinations, class discussions, computer projects, and written assignments, students will provide evidence of their understanding of health, safety and policy issues concerning foods and their ingredients.
  • Develop skills to access, use, and critique scientific and regulatory information from MEDLINE, Agricola, CAB, regulatory sources, government sources, and Internet.

Topical Outline:

  • Food laws and regulations
  • Health claims
  • Dietary supplements
  • Functional foods
  • Soy
  • Food additives (antioxidants, antimicrobials, nitrites, sulfites, enzymes)
  • Nitrites, nitrates, nitrosamines
  • Food allergies
  • Fat replacers
  • Sweeteners
  • Colors
  • Flavors
  • MSG
  • Caffeine
  • Food biotechnology
  • Animal diseases and foods
  • Food irradiation
  • Organic foods
  • Contaminants (pesticides, lead, mercury)
  • Diet, cancer, and food ingredients

Course ID: FDNS 4610/6610. 1 hour.

Course Title: Foodservice Procurement and Financial Management

Course Description:

Purchasing methods, specifications, storage and issuing procedures, inventory systems. Cost control, budgets, and financial statements used in foodservice organizations.

Athena Title: PROCUREMENT FIN MGT

Prerequisite: FDNS 3610-3610L

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

  • To familiarize students with principles and procedures of menu planning, purchasing and financial management in food and nutrition care services.
  • To give students the opportunity to practice forecasting quantities of food to be purchased.
  • To introduce students to the foodservice purchasing market where buying and selling take place and familiarize them with factors that influence this market.
  • To review the regulations and laws that affect market regulation.
  • To allow students practice writing purchase specifications for foodservice.
  • To familiarize students with purchasing methods, the purchasing process and record keeping.
  • To learn the basic principles of financial management, determine costs of services or operations, prepare a budget and interpret financial data.

Topical Outline:

  • Menu Planning
  • Forecasting Quantity
  • The Market and Market Regulation
  • Specifications
  • Purchasing Methods
  • Process and Records
  • Receiving Storage and Inventory Control
  • Financial Management

Course ID: FDNS 4620/6620. 2 hours.

Course Title: Management of Foodservice Organizations

Course Description: Management, staffing, and delivery systems as they pertain to the resources and organization of public and private foodservice institutions.

Athena Title: MGT FDSERV ORG

Prerequisite: FDNS 4610/6610

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

Students will:

  • develop an understanding of the systems theory of foodservice management;
  • develop a working knowledge of the roles and functions of management, including planning, organizing, directing, and controlling. This will include a knowledge of strategic planning, development of mission statements, goals, policies and procedures;
  • develop a working knowledge of management characteristics and theories, and leadership and motivation theories;
  • apply principles of human resource management to address scenarios typically found when delivering food and nutrition services;
  • develop a knowledge of general principles of communication, interpersonal communications skills, group dynamics and negotiation techniques used in management of food and nutrition care services;
  • use current communication techniques, including e-mail and internet to communicate with class members and the course instructor;
  • develop knowledge of human resource management, including interviewing and hiring practices, labor laws and regulations, training, performance appraisal, compensation, and labor relations;
  • apply management and business theories and principles to the development and marketing of a food or nutrition care service.

Topical Outline:

  • What is an Organization?
    • Organizational Structure
  • History of Management Thought Management functions, skills, roles
    • Strategic Planning & Decision
  • Making Marketing and Entrepreneurship
  • Leadership Theory
    • Becoming an Effective Leader
    • Organizational Change
  • Introduction to Human Resource Management
    • Staffing and Employment Process: Recruitment and Interviewing
    • Orientation, Training and Development
    • Motivation
    • Performance Appraisal
    • Performance Problems
    • Employee Compensation
    • Labor Relations
  • Communications Skills/Interpersonal Relationships
    • Group Dynamics
    • Conflict Resolution
  • Managerial Ethics

Course ID: FDNS 4630/6630. 3 hours.

Course Title: Cultural Aspects of Foods and Nutrition

Course Description: Foodways, food habits, and food-related behavior of various population groups and their influences on the nutritional status of group members.

Athena Title: CULTURAL ASPECT FDN

Prerequisite: FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

The student will:

  1. become familiar with the foodways of selected populations within the United States; 
  2. identify factors that influence food-related behavior within population groups;
  3. understand how foods and food-related behavior may be used to maintain cultural identity;
  4. understand the role of food habits in nutritional/health status of individuals and groups;
  5. become familiar with the techniques for studying food- related behaviors;
  6. become familiar with the sources of information on food-related behaviors;
  7. evaluate sources of information on food-related behaviors for reliability;
  8. understand the importance of foodways in nutrition counseling, community nutrition education efforts and marketing of food products.
  9. apply an understanding of the factors affecting food- related behavior to identify influential factors on the food-related behavior of an individual and identify potential positive, neutral and detrimental health consequences, through a written analysis.

 Topical Outline:

  • Origin of foods, foodways and food habits
  • Religious influences on foodways and food habits
  • Influences on the development of mainstream American foodways and their regionality
  • Ethnic foodways of recent immigrant groups
  • Putting it into practice: programming and communication

Course ID: FDNS 4640/6640. 3 hours.

Course Title: Food Sanitation and Safety

Course Description: Safe food handling for foodservice and the consumer, with emphasis on causes and prevention of foodborne illness.

Athena Title: FOOD SANITATION

Prerequisite: FDNS 3600-3600L

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

  • To understand principles of food safety management systems and the responsibilities of all members in the food chain.
  • To be able to apply principles and methods of safe food handling at various steps in the flow of food throughout foodservice and consumer kitchen operations.

Topical Outline:

  • Causes and prevention of foodborne illness
  • Food safety management systems, emphasizing the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) system
  • Recommended safe food handling procedures
  • Sanitation
  • Food safety educational programs

Course ID: FDNS 4645/6645. 2 hours.


Course Title: Nature of Food

Course Description:

Functional and nutritional properties of food products and the modification of food products through reformulation or preparation to meet specific dietary needs.

Athena Title: NATURE OF FOOD

Prerequisite: (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000) and (FDNS 3600 and FDNS 3600L) or permission of department

Pre or Corequisite: (CHEM 2100 and CHEM 2100L) or (CHEM 2211 and CHEM 2211L)

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

Upon completion, the student should be able to:

  1. 1. identify food quality factors that affect consumer selection among food products in the marketplace;
  2. identify food quality factors that affect consumer selection of recipes;
  3. identify functional roles of ingredients and their impact on product quality;
  4. reformulate recipes to meet specific dietary needs;
  5. modify food preparation techniques to meet specific dietary needs;
  6. conduct nutrient analysis to determine if dietary goals were met via product modification; and
  7. apply technology to convey food preparation information to a targeted consumer.

Topical Outline:

  • Consumer Perception of Food Quality and the Gold Standard
  • Functional Roles of Water, Protein-, Carbohydrate- and Fat-based Ingredients
  • Effects of Product Form on Resultant Food Quality
  • Recipe Modification: Ingredient Selection
  • Recipe Modification: Healthy Food Preparation Techniques
  • Nutrient Analysis of Recipes
  • Preparation of Consumer Literature (Recipe Layout and Presentation)

Course ID: FDNS 4646/6646. 1 hour.


Course Title: Food Choices and the Consumer

 

Course Description: Quality factors affecting consumer food choices and conveyance of product-oriented foods and nutrition information to consumers.

Athena Title: Food Choices and the Consumer


Corequisite: FDNS 4645/6645


Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.


Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Objectives

To identify food quality factors that affect consumer selection among available food products/preparation methods.

To understand the principles of food allergen management during food selection, preparation and service.

To apply technology to convey food preparation, and nutrition information to a targeted consumer.

Outline

  • Perception of the sensory characteristics of food
  • Recipe formatting
  • Nutrient calculations
  • Food product evaluations and the gold standard
  • Food allergen management
  • Communication of information about food (preparation, nutrient content, nutrition/health benefits) to consumers
     

Course ID: FDNS 4650/6650. 3 hours. 2 hours lecture and 3 hours lab per week.

Course Title: Experimental Study of Food

Course Description: Functional and nutritional properties of components in food products; techniques to evaluate food products for consumer acceptability including individual and group laboratory experimentation; computer applications.

Athena Title: Experimental Study of Food

Undergraduate Prerequisite: (FDNS 4645/6645 and FDNS 4646/6646 and STAT 2000) or permission of department

Graduate Prerequisite: Permission of department

Pre or Corequisite: (CHEM 2100 and CHEM 2100L) or (CHEM 2211 and CHEM 2211L)

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

  1. identify food quality factors that affect consumer selection in the marketplace
  2. apply the scientific method to the development or modification food products to meet specific consumer needs or wants
  3. locate and evaluate for reliability published food-related resources and identify the intended target audiences
  4. identify functional roles of ingredients and their impact on food quality attributes
  5. select and apply food quality assessment tools (instrumental and sensory) to aid in the development or modification of food products to meet specific consumer needs and wants
  6. use appropriate statistical techniques to evaluate quality outcomes of product formulation or modification of food products to meet specific consumer needs or wants
  7. interpret and present statistical data related food quality assessment
  8. conduct nutrient analysis to determine if nutritive goals were met via product modification and to make recommendations for label claims
  9. present findings from a self-conducted research study to professionals/colleagues using written and oral presentation methods

Topical Outline:

  • Consumer trends
  • Food quality attributes
  • Research process
  • Sensory, rheological and physicochemical evaluation
  • Data collection, statistical analysis and interpretation
  • Presentation of research findings
  • Water, protein, fat, carbohydrate functionality

       
Course ID: FDNS 4660/6660. 3 hours.


Course Title: Food and Nutrition Education Methods

Course Description

Philosophy, principles, methods, and materials involved in nutrition education. Application of nutrition knowledge and skills in the development, delivery, and evaluation of nutrition education curriculum and programs in schools and communities is emphasized.

Athena Title: FD NUTR EDUC

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 4660E/6660E

Nontraditional Format: Lecture and online.

Prerequisite: (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000) and (FDNS 3600 and FDNS 3600L)
Pre or Corequisite: FDNS 3100 or FDNS 4050/6050 or FDNS 4510/6510

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

  1. Understand the leadership role of the nutrition educator.
  2. Utilize the principles of health promotion and health behavior theory in the selection and design of nutrition education approaches.
  3. Apply learning theory in the selection and design of nutrition education programs.
  4. Utilize criteria to evaluate teaching resources available from a variety of sources including government agencies, commercial publishers, the internet, etc. for use in nutrition education programs.
  5. Design and develop nutrition education programs for selected populations.
  6. Design, select and adapt nutrition education programs to meet the needs of diverse populations including culture, age, ethnicity, gender and social class.
  7. Utilize appropriate strategies and technology in delivering nutrition education concepts including food demonstration.
  8. Understand the role of needs assessment, process evaluation and outcome evaluation in assessing nutrition education programs.
  9. Be involved in service learning experiences in a variety of settings and complete a reflection component.

Topical Outline

  1. The role of leadership in nutrition education.
  2. Foundations in Theory in Health Promotion and Health Behavior
  3. Learning Theories and Applications
  4. Nutrition Education in Clinical and Community Setting
  5. Designing and Implementing Nutrition Education Programs using a variety of materials and media
  6. Learning for Special Audiences
  7. Adapting Nutrition Education Program to meet the needs of diverse populations
  8. Evaluating Nutrition Programs and Materials

       
Course ID: FDNS 4600E/6600E. 3 hours.

Course Title: Food and Nutrition Policy

Course Description

Philosophy, principles, methods, and materials involved in nutrition education. Application of nutrition knowledge and skills in the development, delivery, and evaluation of nutrition education curriculum and programs in schools and communities is emphasized.

Athena Title: FOOD NUTR POLICY

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 4600 or FDNS 6600

Nontraditional Format: This course will be taught 95% or more online.

Prerequisite: (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000) or (FDNS 3600 and FDNS 3600L)

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

  1. Understand the leadership role of the nutrition educator.
  2. Utilize the principles of health promotion and health behavior theory in the selection and design of nutrition education approaches.
  3. Apply learning theory in the selection and design of nutrition education programs.
  4. Utilize criteria to evaluate teaching resources available from a variety of sources including government agencies, commercial publishers, the internet, etc. for use in nutrition education programs.
  5. Design and develop nutrition education programs for selected populations.
  6. Design, select and adapt nutrition education programs to meet the needs of diverse populations including culture, age, ethnicity, gender and social class.
  7. Utilize appropriate strategies and technology in delivering nutrition education concepts including food demonstration.
  8. Understand the role of needs assessment, process evaluation and outcome evaluation in assessing nutrition education programs.
  9. Be involved in service learning experiences in a variety of settings and complete a reflection component.

Topical Outline

  1. The role of leadership in nutrition education.
  2. Foundations in Theory in Health Promotion and Health Behavior
  3. Learning Theories and Applications
  4. Nutrition Education in Clinical and Community Setting
  5. Designing and Implementing Nutrition Education Programs using a variety of materials and media
  6. Learning for Special Audiences
  7. Adapting Nutrition Education Program to meet the needs of diverse populations
  8. Evaluating Nutrition Programs and Materials

       
Course ID: FDNS 4900. 1 hour.

Course Title: Seminar in Foods and Nutrition

Course Description

Survey of current literature on selected topics in foods and nutrition.

Athena Title: SEMINAR

Prerequisite: FDNS 3100

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall and spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

Present at least one seminar in an area in foods and nutrition. Evaluate seminars presented by others.

Topical Outline

  • Choosing a seminar topic
  • Using the PowerPoint program
  • Improving speaking skills
  • Presenting seminar
  • Evaluating seminars given by others

       
Course ID: FDNS 4960H. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 3 hours credit.

Course Title: Directed Honors Research

Course Description Individual study, reading, or projects under the direction of a project director.

Athena Title: HONORS DIR RES

Nontraditional Format: Directed study.

Prerequisite: (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000) and permission of Honors

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:
The student will formulate and test a hypothesis for an independent research project on any topic related to foods and nutrition.

Topical Outline:
Research in a topic to be selected after discussion with an advisor or research scientist. Background research Formulation of a hypothesis Development of study aims, study design, methods Conducting a research study Summarization and interpretation of research results


Course ID: FDNS 4970H. 3 hours.

Course Title: Directed Reading and/or Projects (Honors)

Course Description

Individual study, reading, or projects under the guidance of a project director.

Athena Title: DIRECTED READING

Nontraditional Format: Directed research with a faculty member.

Prerequisite: Permission of Honors

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

       
Course ID: FDNS 4980H. 3 hours.

Course Title: Directed Reading and/or Projects (Honors)

Course Description: Individual study, reading, or projects under the guidance of a project director.

Athena Title: DIRECTED READING

Nontraditional Format: Individual research with a faculty member.

Prerequisite: Permission of Honors

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

       
Course ID: FDNS 4990H. 3 hours.

Course Title: Honors Research

Course Description: Individual research in Foods and Nutrition or a closely related field.

Athena Title: HONORS RESEARCH

Nontraditional Format: Directed study.

Prerequisite: Permission of Honors

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course ID: FDNS 5010. 3-9 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit.

Course Title: Directed Research in Nutrition Science

Course Description

Independent research designed for the nutrition science major. Literature review, laboratory work, experimental design, and interpretation of the results will be required.

Athena Title: NUTRI SCI RESEARCH

Nontraditional Format: Directed research.

Prerequisite: FDNS 3100 or BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

Provide a research experience to undergraduate students in Nutrition Science. Prepare students for admission to graduate or professional school in which biomedical research is part of the program of study.

Topical Outline

  • Research in nutrition and diabetes or obesity.
  • Research in nutrition and cancer.
  • Research in behavior related to food consumption and health outcomes.
  • Research in nutrition and heart disease.
  • Research in a topic to be selected after discussion with an advisor or research scientist.

       
Course ID: FDNS 5020. 3-6 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Course Title: Directed Research in Consumer Foods

Course Description

Independent research in consumer foods, including literature review, laboratory work, experimental design, and interpretation of the results.

Athena Title: CONSUMER FOODS RES

Nontraditional Format: Directed study.

Prerequisite: FDNS 3600-3600L and (STAT 2000 or STAT 2210) and permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

  • To apply the research process to a Consumer Food issue;
  • To present, interpret and discuss the results from a research project in written and/or oral format

Topical Outline

  • Reviewing the professional literature and identification of a research problem
  • Writing the project justification, stating the hypothesis and objectives
  • Selecting the appropriate research methodology and designing the experiment
  • Collecting, analyzing data and summarizing and interpreting the results
  • Preparation and delivery of a written or oral report

       
Course ID: FDNS 5030. 3-9 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit.

Course Title: Directed Research in Dietetics

Course Description

Independent research designed for the dietetics major. Literature review, laboratory work, experimental design, and interpretation of the results will be required.

Athena Title: RESEARCH DIETETICS

Nontraditional Format: Directed research with format appropriate for research project. Variable hours.

Prerequisite: FDNS 3100

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

The student will formulate and test a hypothesis for an independent research project on any topic related to dietetics

Topical Outline

  • Background research
  • Formulation of a hypothesis
  • Development of study aims, study design, methods
  • Conducting a research study
  • Summarization and interpretation of research results

Course ID: FDNS(EPID) 5040/7040. 3 hours.

Course Title: Nutritional Epidemiology

Course Description

An introduction to the basic concepts of nutritional epidemiology such as measuring disease frequency, prevalence, incidence, proportions; use of screening during human disease outbreak; and food poisoning investigations. Modeling of experimental and observational epidemiologic study designs used in the field of nutrition, critique of scientific papers, and ethical issues in nutrition research and publication.

Athena Title: NUTR EPIDEMIOLOGY

Pre or Corequisite: FDNS 4050/6050 or FDNS 4510/6510

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

This course introduces food and nutrition students and public health students to basic epidemiologic tools needed for community and population level nutrition research. By the end of this course, students will learn to use basic concepts of nutritional epidemiology such as measuring nutrient deficiency or disease frequency, prevalence, incidence, proportions, and measures of effect (odds ratio, relative risk etc) in assessing health and nutrition risks at the population level. Students will also learn how to screen for specific conditions during nutrition emergencies and human health outbreak investigations including exposure and outcome measurements (diet and disease). Students will acquire the basic skills for monitoring the food consumption, nutrient intake and nutritional status of a population. Students will have in-depth understanding of the various study designs and their respective applications, and ethical issues in nutrition research.

Topical Outline

  • Nutritional Assessment:
    • Dietary, Biochemical
    • Clinical
    • Anthropometry
  • Misclassification Analysis:
    • Sensitivity
    • Specificity
    • Predictive value
  • Research Design:
    • Observational
    • Experimental
    • Quasi-experimental
  • Causality Analysis:
    • Confounding
    • Validity
    • Power analysis
  • Monitoring & Surveillance:
    • National Nutrition Monitoring System
  • Nutrition Program Evaluation:
    • Formative
    • Process
    • Outcome/Impact
  • Maternal and Child Nutrition and Health Issues (Graduate students literature evaluation for term paper)

       
Course ID: FDNS 5300. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit.

Course Title: Senior Thesis

Course Description: Research project and thesis writing.

Athena Title: SENIOR THESIS

Nontraditional Format: Thesis.

Prerequisite: FDNS 3100

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

  • Write an undergraduate thesis on a topic related to foods and nutrition.
  • Edit thesis according to faculty advisor's evaluation.

Topical Outline

  • Choosing area of study
  • Identifying references
  • Improving writing skills
  • Writing thesis
  • Editing thesis

Course ID: FDNS 5800. 3 hours.

Course Title: Dietetics Practicum

Course Description : Work experience under the direction of a dietitian in a health care or foodservice facility.

Athena Title: DIETETICS PRACTICUM

Nontraditional Format: Supervised work experience with a dietitian or other professional in the field of foods and nutrition.

Prerequisite: (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000) and FDNS 3600 and FDNS 3600L and permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

Students will be exposed to the application of nutrition care principles in a dietetic practice setting. Students will interact with professionals in the field of dietetics.

Topical Outline

  • Professional interactions in various dietetics practice settings
  • Patient or client interactions in various dietetics practice settings
  • Delivery of foods and nutrition information
  • Application of nutrition care principles
  • Introduction to organizational systems in various dietetic practice settings

       
Course ID: FDNS 5910/7910. 3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.

Course Title: Foods and Nutrition Internship

Course Description: Supervised experience in dietetics, foodservice management, or a foods and nutrition related industry.

Athena Title: FD NUTR INTERNSHIP

Nontraditional Format: Supervised practice experience only. Variable hours.

Prerequisite: (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000) and (FDNS 3600 and FDNS 3600L) and POD

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

Perform basic skills as related to the practice of dietetics in Clinical, Community and/or Foodservice settings Satisfactorily perform the skills and knowledge requirements as outlined in the Core Competencies for the Supervised Practice Component of Entry-Level Dietitian Education Program provided by the American Dietetic Association

Topical Outline

  • Clinical Rotations: perform and supervised nutrition screening, assessment, manage normal nutrition care needs of individuals and those with simple and complex medical conditions
  • Community Rotations: develop and review educational materials, develop and review outcomes for food and nutrition services and practice, provide dietetics education and supervise education for target groups
  • Food Service Systems Management Rotations: participate in business or operating plan development, participate in organizational change and planning and goal setting processes, perform marketing and human resource functions, supervise the collection and processing of financial data, supervise food production and development of recipes, manage safety and sanitation issues
  • All Rotations: perform ethically in accordance with the values of the American Dietetic Association, participate in professional activities, use current technologies for information and communication activities
  • Perform self-assessment and participate in professional development

       
Course ID: FDNS 5930. 3-6 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.

Course Title: Consumer Foods Internship

Course Description: Work in a public or private institution to obtain practical professional experience.

Athena Title: CONS FOODS INTERN

Nontraditional Format: Internship.

Prerequisite: (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H or FDNS 2220 or FDNS 3000) and FDNS 3600 and FDNS 3600L and permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

  • To apply concepts and techniques learned in coursework to the real world of work
  • To provide an opportunity for the intern to become acquainted with the overall function of an agency or business

Topical Outline

  • Development of professional skills required for success in the particular agency or business
  • Completion of tasks and assignments typical of an entry level employee in the internship site
  • Critique of personal career goals in light of the internship experience

       
Course ID: FDNS 6400. 3 hours.

Course Title: Advanced Macronutrients

Course Description: Literature of human nutrition related to macronutrients; includes metabolism, genetics, physiology, biochemistry, endocrinology, and epidemiology.

Athena Title: ADV MACRONUTRIENTS

Prerequisite: BCMB(BIOL)(CHEM) 3100 and VPHY 3100

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

  • Understand the physiological and biochemical regulation of nutrient metabolism
  • Learn the importance of integration of different metabolic pathways and of the mechanisms that maintain homeostasis
  • Discuss the metabolic basis for chronic diseases that can be modified by nutrient intake
  • Discuss current issues related to nutrition and disease and the metabolic basis for this interaction

Topical Outline

  • Review of cell structure and function
  • Membrane transport and cellular energy production
  • Water and acid-base balance
  • Tools for measuring intake
  • Nutrient Requirements Macronutrient selection Energy balance and obesity Control of food intake Energy expenditure, uncoupling proteins, diet induced thermogenesis Protein metabolism Carbohydrate metabolism and the role of the liver in glucose metabolism Diabetes Fat metabolism Metabolism in specific physiological conditions, such as exercise, starvation and pregnancy

       
Course ID: FDNS 6580. 1-3 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit.
Course Title: Graduate Special Topics in Foods and Nutrition

Course Description: Selected topics from the field of foods and nutrition.

Athena Title: GRAD FOOD NUTR TOP

Prerequisite: FDNS 4100/6100 or FDNS 6400 or permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Not offered on a regular basis.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:
Upon completion of this course, student will be able to: 1. Describe the impact of current issues in foods and nutrition on society. 2. Discuss practical implications of the current problem and propose practical solutions that improve current practices. 3. Engage in discussion and problem solving with regard to current issues of foods and nutrition. 4. Discuss and summarize the most recent and relevant literature related to the specific topics of the class. 5. Develop effective written and oral communication skills via class discussions and projects.

Topical Outline:
Topical outline will vary by instructor but will cover the following: 1. Identification and discussion of the current issues and problems. 2. Key concepts, theories, and background information with regard to the current issues and problems. 3. Critical literature related to the current issues and problems. 4. Potential solutions for the current issues and problems. 5. Implications of the current issues and problems for the present and future.

       
Course ID: FDNS 4770/6770. 4 hours.

Course Title: Managing School Nutrition Programs

Course Description: Principles of managing school nutrition programs, including federal, state, and local regulations; planning appealing and nutritious meals for children; budget management; human resources management; organizational leadership; marketing and communications; planning, assessment, and evaluation of programs.

Athena Title: Managing School Nutrition Prog

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 4770E or FDNS 6770E

Undergraduate Prerequisite: (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H) and FDNS 3610 and FDNS 3610L
Graduate Prerequisite: (FDNS 2100 or FDNS 2100E or FDNS 2100H) and FDNS 4050/6050

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to:

  1. Understand the principles of managing School Nutrition Programs.
  2. Know the historical and philosophical foundation of School Nutrition Programs.
  3. Understand the governance of School Nutrition Programs.
  4. Promote nutrition integrity and nutrition education.
  5. Understand financial management of School Nutrition Programs
  6. Plan, assess, and evaluate School Nutrition Programs.
  7. Plan customer focused healthy and appealing meals.
  8. Procure food and food production equipment.
  9. Direct the preparation of healthy and appealing meals.
  10. Meet the nutritional needs of special needs children in schools.
  11. Understand the principles of community relations and collaboration.
  12. Understand and implement communications and marketing techniques for effective School Nutrition Programs.
  13. Understand the unique features of managing human relations in School Nutrition Programs.
  14. Understand and implement key features of customer service for School Nutrition Programs.

Topical Outline

  1. Perspectives on managing School Nutrition Programs
  2. Historical and philosophical foundation of School Nutrition Programs
  3. Governance of School Nutrition Programs
  4. Promoting nutrition integrity and nutrition education
  5. Financial management: the school lunch business
  6. Planning, assessing and evaluating School Nutrition Programs
  7. Planning customer focused healthy and appealing meals
  8. Procurement and food production systems
  9. Directing the production of healthy and appealing meals
  10. Meeting nutrition feeds of children with special needs in schools
  11. Community relations and collaboration
  12. Communications and marketing
  13. Managing human resources
  14. Customer service

       
Course ID: FDNS 7000. 1-12 hours. Repeatable for maximum 35 hours credit.

Course Title: Master's Research

Course Description: Research while enrolled for a master's degree under the direction of faculty members.

Athena Title: MASTER'S RESEARCH

Nontraditional Format: Independent research under the direction of a faculty member.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)

       
Course ID: FDNS 7010. 1-12 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit.

Course Title: Directed Research in Foods and Nutrition

Course Description: Individual guidance in the development of a research project. A written report of the problem or project will be required.

Athena Title: DIRECTED FDN RES

Nontraditional Format: Directed research.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

       
Course ID:
FDNS 7300. 1-12 hours. Repeatable for maximum 35 hours credit.

Course Title: Master's Thesis

Course Description: Thesis writing under the direction of the major professor.

Athena Title: MASTER'S THESIS

Nontraditional Format: Independent research and thesis preparation.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)

       
Course ID: KINS(HPRB)(FDNS) 7600. 4 hours.

Course Title: Public Health Physical Activity and Nutrition Interventions

Course Description: Provides students with strong preparation for their future roles as leaders in nutrition and physical activity intervention for health promotion and disease prevention.

Athena Title: HEALTH INTERVENTION

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in EXRS 7600

Semester Course Offered: Offered spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives:
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

1. Utilize general systems theory as it relates to community health promotion and disease prevention.

2. Utilize health behavior theory to guide the selection/ development of interventions for groups and populations.

3. Select/ develop appropriate interventions for various community settings based on best practice.

4. Incorporate nutrition and physical activity environmental interventions into community health programs.

5. Use and advocate for public policy options and opportunities to promote nutrition and physical activity.

6. Describe the ethical, philosophical, and scientific issues in nutrition and physical activity intervention.

7. Provide defensible rationale, orally and in writing, for nutrition and physical activity programs and policies to decision makers (community citizens, community leaders and peers.


Topical Outline:
1.Introduction to interventions: Systems Theory

2.Health Behavior Theory as a guide for interventions

3.Translating Science into practice: CDC Guide to Preventive Services, Dietary Guidance for Groups and Populations

4.Program Development Process

5.Review of Interventions: Family Based

6.Review of Interventions: Faith Based

7.Review of Interventions: School/School Related

8.Review of Interventions: Worksite

9.Review of Interventions: Environmental Approaches (grocery stores, restaurants, vending, planned/built environment)

10.Adapting interventions to culturally diverse populations

11.Public Policy as a Nutrition and Physical Activity Intervention 12.Evaluating Interventions

13.Ethical Considerations in Nutrition and Physical Activity Interventions

       
Course ID: FDNS 7911. 2 hours. Repeatable for maximum 8 hours credit.

Course Title: Dietetics Internship

Course Description: Supervised dietetic internship experience in clinical nutrition, long-term care, and community nutrition for older adults, schools, public health, and extension.

Athena Title: DIETETICS INTERN

Nontraditional Format: Supervised practice and case studies; 80 contact hours per 1 credit (about 5.33 hours/week).

Prerequisite: Permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall and spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

  • Provide an applied, supervised practice experience as related to the practice of dietetics in clinical, long-term care, community, and/or food service settings
  • Provide an applied, supervised practice experience for the application of professional standards and ethics related to dietetics
  • Stimulate independent critical thinking related to the practice of dietetics
  • Reinforce curriculum content through experiential learning
  • Facilitate professional development
  • Promote communication skills
  • Provide experiences that will lead from internships to careers

Topical Outline

After completing this one credit course four times, students will have completed these activities:

  1. Clinical nutrition in acute care: perform and supervise nutrition screening, assessment, management of normal nutrition care needs of individuals and those with simple and complex medical conditions
  2. Clinical nutrition in long-term care: perform and supervise nutrition screening, assessment, management of normal nutrition care needs of individuals and those with simple and complex medical conditions
  3. Community-based nutrition services for older adults: in a setting such as a senior center, develop and review educational materials, develop and review outcomes for food and nutrition services and practice, provide dietetics education and supervise education for target groups, participate in the review of menus for home-delivered and congregate meals
  4. Community-based nutrition services: in settings such as schools, public health, WIC, Cooperative Extension Service, and/or food assistance programs, develop and review educational materials, develop and review outcomes for food and nutrition services and practice, provide dietetics education and supervise education for target groups
  5. Present case studies and presentations on:
    • Medical nutrition therapy for simple and complex medical conditions in different settings (acute care, long-term care, outpatient)
    • Community nutrition across the lifespan and with diverse cultures
    • Nutrition education in different settings and with diverse cultures (wellness, public health, schools)
  6. Develop a business plan for a product, program or service
  7. Demonstrate use of organizational processes and tools to manage human resources
  8. Participate in public policy activities, including both legislative and regulatory initiatives
  9. Participate in professional development activities including development of a professional portfolio, completion of a professional development form, and participation in planning a professional event
  10. All activities: use current technologies for information and communication activities, respond appropriately to diverse audiences and cultures, participate in professional activities, and perform ethically in accordance with the values of the American Dietetic Association

       
Course ID: FDNS 7930. 3-9 hours. Repeatable for maximum 9 hours credit.

Course Title: Consumer Foods Internship

Course Description: Work in a public or private institution to obtain practical professional experience.

Athena Title: CON FOODS INTERN

Nontraditional Format: Internship.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

  • To apply concepts and techniques learned in coursework to the real world of work
  • To provide an opportunity for the intern to become acquainted with the overall function of an agency or business

Topical Outline

  • Development of professional skills required for success in the particular agency or business
  • Completion of tasks and assignments typical of an entry level employee in the internship site
  • Critique of personal career goals in light of the internship experience

       
Course ID: FDNS(KINS) 7940. 3-9 hours. Repeatable for maximum 45 hours credit.

Course Title: Nutrition, Physical Activity, Exercise, and Sport Internship

Course Description: Supervised experience in physical activity, exercise, and/or sport nutrition involving food and nutrition services tailored to the unique nutritional needs of competitive athletes, recreational athletes, and others engaged in physical activity and exercise to improve health and performance.

Athena Title: NUTR EX SPORT INT

Nontraditional Format: Supervised practice experience only.

Pre or Corequisite: FDNS 6400 or FDNS(KINS) 4220/6220 or FDNS(KINS) 8230 or permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

  • Provide an applied, supervised practice experience as related to the practice of sport nutrition in collegiate, food service, community, and/or other settings
  • Provide an applied, supervised practice experience for the application of professional standards and ethics related to physical activity, exercise and sport nutrition
  • Stimulate independent critical thinking related to the practice of physical activity, exercise and sport nutrition
  • Reinforce curriculum content through experiential learning related to physical activity, exercise and sport nutrition
  • Facilitate professional development in the area of physical activity, exercise and sport nutrition
  • Promote communication skills related to physical activity, exercise and sport nutrition

Topical Outline

Under the supervision of a Registered and Licensed Dietitian with expertise in physical activity, exercise and sport nutrition, students will be involved in the following:

  1. Obtain experience in collaborating with athletes, coaches and coaching staff, athletic departments, sports medicine departments and clinics, hospital, university and community wellness programs, food services, and others in providing comprehensive and integrated physical activity, exercise and sport nutrition services tailored to the unique nutritional needs of athletes and others involved in promoting physical activity and exercise to improve health and fitness
  2. Understand the training, education, and licensing requirements for physical activity, exercise and sport dietitians, and the scope of practice for physical activity, exercise and sport nutrition dietitians and related disciplines
  3. Develop and review educational materials and outcomes for food and nutrition services and practice related to physical activity, exercise and sport nutrition
  4. Provide physical activity, exercise and sport nutrition education for groups related to specific foods, beverages, supplements, macronutrients, micronutrients, electrolytes, hydration, and other nutrition related concerns
  5. Develop skills in nutrition screening, assessment, and management of physical activity, exercise and sport nutrition related concerns for athletes and others involved in exercise to develop health and fitness
  6. Understand the role of food service in providing appropriate foods and beverages for athletes and others involved in physical activity and exercise to develop health and fitness during training, competition, recovery, and rehabilitation with an emphasis on optimizing food, nutrient, and fluid intake, and maintaining the safety and quality of foods and beverages
  7. For all activities, perform ethically in accordance with the values of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, participate in professional activities, use current technologies for information and communication activities
  8. Perform self-assessment and participate in professional development activities related to physical activity, exercise and sport nutrition

       
Course ID: FDNS 7950. 1 hour.

Course Title: School Nutrition Field Experience I

Course Description: Sequenced activities in a school nutrition setting that focus on observation and practice of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions delineated in state and national standards.

Athena Title: School Nutrition Field Exp I

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 7950E

Nontraditional Format: Worksite-embedded. Sequenced experiences in the job setting as described by the Georgia Public Services Commission for endorsement programs. Ensures an orientation for ongoing job- related activities in the absence of the clear, renewal certificate required for job retention.

Prerequisite:
SNDCP admittance

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall and spring semester every year.

Grading System: S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)

Course Objectives

  • To ascertain the day-to-day activities performed by a School Nutrition Director or Coordinator;
  • To become acquainted with the School Nutrition Program at the district level allowing diversity within the district (demographic and physical facilities) and the potential impact on program delivery to be identified;
  • To recognize proper production procedures (kitchen procedures, loading dock maintenance, meal service and serving line procedures, cashiering procedures, food storage, chemical storage, signage display, required records);
  • To recognize the principles and methods of safe food handling at various steps in the flow of food throughout food service operations;
  • To recognize the symptoms of food allergies vs. food intolerances and other food-related diseases and the principles and methods of control that should be implemented in the front-of the house and back-of-the house;
  • To demonstrate knowledge on the Code of Ethics for Georgia Educators.

Topical Outline

After completing this course, students will have completed these activities:

1. Interview with another director or the outgoing director regarding activities and skills required to handle delineated day-to-day School Nutrition Program job-related responsibilities (compare to job description and own skill set with a self efficacy assessment)

2. School Nutrition Program Profile Assessment with reflective statement on implications for delivery of School Nutrition Program in the district

3. On-site visits for each school in the district with assessment; alternatively in a large system, visit a minimum of two schools at each level (must include most and least Free/Reduced population; most and least English as a Second Language population; newest or most recently renovated facility and oldest facility). Reflective statement on what impacts successful SNP delivery, based on check-off assessment and observation

4. ServSafe® Food Safety Certification or approved alternative (complete course if needed)

5. Food Allergen Certification(s) (complete ServSafe® on-line food allergen course if needed and school nutrition specific module)

6. Pass GaPSC ethics module, a set of standards to guide the ethical performance of all educators in Georgia

7. Dispositions assessment completed by immediate supervisor submitted
 

       
Course ID: FDNS 7970E. 1 hour.

Course Title: School Nutrition Field Experience II

Course Description: Documentation of on-site participation in job-related activities required of a School Nutrition Director that focuses on practice and demonstration of the knowledge, skills, and dispositions delineated in state and national standards.

Athena Title: School Nutrition Field Exp II

Duplicate Credit: Not open to students with credit in FDNS 7970

Nontraditional Format: This course will be taught 95% or more online. Submission of documentation of successful completion of worksite-embedded tasks; documentation submitted when at least 500 total verified contact hours in the workplace have been met. Ensures needed skill set for ongoing job-related activities has been developed prior to receiving a recommendation for the clear, renewal certificate required for job retention.

Prerequisite: FDNS 7950 or FDNS 7950E
Pre or Corequisite: (FDNS 4770/6770 or FDNS 4770E/6770E) and (FDNS 4660/6660 or FDNS 4660E/6660E)

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)

Course Objectives

  • To recognize personal professional strengths and weaknesses and the need to become a life-long learner.
  • To document service of menus appropriate at each school level and their compliance with federal nutritional guidance.
  • To document successful oversight and the application of improvement strategies, if necessary with lack of compliance, of the meal counting and claiming system in individual schools (SFA).
  • To document appropriate application of federal criteria when evaluating applications for free and reduced meal eligibility.
  • To document compliance with production procedures and established food safety standards and the ability to access the situation and recommend appropriate corrective action in day-to-day operations if necessary.
  • To use available School Nutrition Operation Financial Reports to accurately describe the financial status of the program and to identify any needed changes.
  • To illustrate the ability to communicate the mission of the School Nutrition Program to at least one group of stakeholders.

Topical Outline

1. A task analysis for one week with linkages made to managerial functions, and required skills with a comparison to job description and self efficacy assessment and plans for future professional development

2. Submission of a week of menus from each school level served within the current school year with nutritional compliance documentation

3. Assessment provided for the meal counting and claiming system on-site review for each school in the district with recommended actions and documentation of the follow-up visit if appropriate (both specific schools and school representative may be redacted)

4. Submission of eligibility decision for free/reduced applications along with a brief statement outlining criteria used as the basis of decision-making (identifying information should be redacted)

5. Documentation of compliance with health and safety regulations (submit health inspection reports by SFA); completion of production assessment for any site not meeting state standards with specific recommendations for corrective action

6. Analysis of School Nutrition Operations Financial Management Reports (Lunch Participation and Cost Report, Breakfast Participation and Cost Report, Snack Participation and Cost Report, Non-reimbursable Sales Report, Statement of Revenues and Expenditures, and Cash Resource Management Report) along with an assessment of where the program stands and plans for any needed adjustments (based primarily on Cash Resource Management Report with remaining reports used to support needed adjustments)

7. Documentation and evaluation of a School Nutrition Program promotion (nutrition education, wellness and/or marketing related)

8. Performance assessments to be completed on-line by immediate supervisors (local and state)
 

       
Course ID: FDNS(KINS) 8230. 3 hours.

Course Title: Advanced Nutrition in Physical Activity, Exercise, and Sport

Course Description: Role of health professionals in supporting health and performance of competitive athletes, recreational athletes, and others engaged in physical activity and exercise through interpretation and application of evidence-based recommendations for food, nutrient, fluid, and supplement intakes, nutritional assessment, body composition, and weight management, and understanding the scope of professional practice.

Athena Title: ADV NUTR SPORT

Prerequisite: (KINS 4630/6630 or KINS 7330-7330L) and permission of department
Pre or Corequisite: FDNS 6400

Semester Course Offered: Not offered on a regular basis.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

The course objectives are to prepare students from foods and nutrition and/or kinesiology to assume leadership roles in supporting optimal health and human performance for competitive athletes, recreational athletes, or individuals engaged in physical activity and exercise to improve health and physical performance through development of an advanced knowledge of

  1. metabolism of macronutrients, micronutrients, and water;
  2. nutrient bioenergetics;
  3. optimizing nutrient intake;
  4. thermoregulation and fluid balance;
  5. foods, supplements and ergogenic aids;
  6. body weight management;
  7. nutrition assessment and intervention;
  8. nutrition management of sports teams;
  9. controversies in sports nutrition;
  10. critically evaluating and applying new products and new research in sports nutrition; and
  11. scope of practice issues for dietitians and other health professionals related to sports nutrition.

Topical Outline

  1. Nutrition and nutrient metabolism for optimal health and human performance
    • Macronutrients: carbohydrates, lipids, protein
    • Micronutrients and water
    • Biology and chemistry related to food digestion and absorption
  2. Advanced nutrient bioenergetics in exercise and training
    • Bioenergetics
    • Macronutrient metabolism with exercise
    • Measurement of energy expenditure
  3. Optimizing nutrient intake to maximize health and performance
    • Recommendations for active individuals
    • Considerations for nutrient intake in training and competition
    • Special conditions (e.g., travel, high altitude, gender, and age)
  4. Thermoregulation and fluid balance during various types of exercise
    • Temperature regulation
    • Fluid replacement
  5. Food, supplements and purported ergogenic aids (pharmacologic and nutritional)
    • Strength and speed
    • Endurance performance
    • Evaluating the scientific literature
    • Contamination of products with banned substances
  6. Diet, body composition, healthy weight management, eating disorders
  7. Nutrition assessment and intervention
  8. Nutrition management of sports teams
  9. Controversies in sports nutrition
  10. Critically evaluating and applying new products and new research in sports nutrition
    • Reviewing the research literature in sports nutrition
    • Principles of evaluation of sports nutrition foods, supplements, and ergogenic aids
  11. Scope of practice issues for dietitians and other health professionals caring for athletes

       
Course ID
: FDNS 8530. 3 hours.

Course Title: Nutrition and Disease Processes I

Course Description: Epidemiological, clinical, animal, and cellular studies linking diet and diseases including cancer and heart disease. Biochemical and physiological mechanisms by which nutrients prevent disease.

Athena Title: NUTR DISEASE I

Pre or Corequisite: FDNS 4100/6100 or FDNS 6400 or permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall semester every even-numbered year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

  • Discuss general epidemiological principles
  • Demonstrate understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and cancer
  • Demonstrate knowledge of epidemiological research supporting links between nutrition and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the proposed biochemical mechanisms by which diet and nutrition influence the development of cardiovascular disease and cancer
  • Discuss the rationale for current dietary recommendations designed to prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease

Topical Outline

  • Epidemiological Principles
  • Nutritional epidemiology of cardiovascular disease
  • Diet, nutrition and cardiovascular disease: biochemical mechanisms
  • Establishment of current dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention
  • The link between obesity and chronic disease
  • Nutritional epidemiology of cancer
  • Diet, nutrition and cancer: biochemical mechanisms
  • Establishment of current dietary recommendations for cancer prevention

       
Course ID: FDNS(KINS)(HPAM)(HPRB)(ECHD) 8595. 1 hour. Repeatable for maximum 2 hours credit.

Course Title: Survey of Obesity and Weight Management

Course Description: Survey of obesity and weight management from interdisciplinary perspectives, including food, nutrition, agriculture, physical activity and exercise, behavioral coaching and intervention, public health, public policy, environment, and related areas.

Athena Title: Survey of Obesity Weight Manag

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

  • Recognize the complexity of human obesity and weight management from interdisciplinary perspectives, including food, nutrition, agriculture, physical activity and exercise, behavioral coaching and intervention, public health, public policy, environment, and related areas.
  • Improve skills in critically evaluating and discussing the evidence base for approaches to obesity prevention and weight management from the peer-reviewed literature.
  • Integrate knowledge from multiple perspectives regarding multi- and interdisciplinary solutions to human obesity and weight management.

Topical Outline

  • The speakers will include scientists, practitioners, policy makers, and other individuals working in the area of obesity and/or weight management.
  • Graduate students will also give seminars about their research, outreach, service learning, practicums, and/or internships related to obesity.
  • The topics will vary somewhat each semester, but the focus will include interdisciplinary perspectives related to:
    • 1. Food, nutrition, and agriculture
    • 2. Physical activity and exercise
    • 3. Behavioral coaching and intervention
    • 4. Public health
    • 5. Public policy
    • 6. Environment
    • 7. Other areas related to obesity and weight management
       

       
Course ID: FDNS 8900. 1-6 hours. Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.

Course Title: Seminar in Foods and Nutrition

Course Description: Literature on selected topics in foods and nutrition.

Athena Title: SEMINAR IN FDN

Prerequisite: Permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall and spring semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

Course Objectives

  • Learn how to access current literature on foods and nutrition.
  • Learn skills in giving oral presentations.
  • Use constructive criticism to improve oral presentation skills.

Topical Outline

  • Identify topic for semester.
  • Online searching for research information.
  • Guideline for human and animal research in foods and nutrition.
  • Effective use of Power Point for oral presentations.
  • Use of digital camera and other sources for graphics in presentations.
  • Key points for organizing and giving an effective oral presentation.
  • Giving constructive critiques.
  • Give oral presentations to department staff, students, and faculty.

       
Course ID: FDNS 9000. 1-12 hours. Repeatable for maximum 35 hours credit.

Course Title: Doctoral Research

Course Description: Research while enrolled for a doctoral degree under the direction of faculty members.

Athena Title: DOCTORAL RESEARCH

Nontraditional Format: Independent research under the direction of a faculty member.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)

       
Course ID: FDNS 9010. 1-12 hours. Repeatable for maximum 12 hours credit.

Course Title: Directed Research in Foods and Nutrition

Course Description: Independent study and/or research under supervision of a faculty member. No more than six hours may be counted toward master's degree requirements.

Athena Title: DIRECTED FDN RES

Nontraditional Format: Directed research.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: A-F (Traditional)

       
Course ID: FDNS 9300. 1-12 hours. Repeatable for maximum 35 hours credit.

Course Title: Doctoral Dissertation

Course Description: Dissertation writing under the direction of the major professor.

Athena Title: DOCT DISSERTATION

Nontraditional Format: Independent research and preparation of the doctoral dissertation.

Prerequisite: Permission of department

Semester Course Offered: Offered fall, spring and summer semester every year.

Grading System: S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)