Research Interests
Finance

Sophia Anong
Assistant Professor

I am very interested in the impact of mobile finance (transfers as well as payments) particularly mobile money through non-bank providers in African countries. This is mostly from the point of view of consumer empowerment in using mobile technology for financial access and transactions. My research interests also include financial knowledge and its impact, and also interrelationships between indicators of financial vulnerability, health-related decisions, and health status and how they vary across socioeconomic groups.

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Swarn Chatterjee
Associate Professor, Graduate Coordinator

My research focuses on three primary areas: Performance evaluation across different stages of the financial planning process; Examination of the association between financial well-being, welfare dependency, and health among underserved populations; and Identification of factors that improve financial decision making among transitioning young adults and the elderly households.

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Brenda Cude
Professor, Undergraduate Coordinator

My current research focuses on college students' financial literacy. What makes a college student financially literate? What's the most reliable way to measure their financial literacy? How much difference would having more financial knowledge make for college students' financial behaviors? How do personality characteristics influence students' financial decisions?

I also am interested in research related to online consumer behaviors, consumer information, and consumer policy

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Joseph Goetz
Associate Professor

My research focuses on financial planning performance and financial therapy; more specifically, within the context of financial planning, I examine the fiduciary standard of care, investment risk tolerance, and pedagogical techniques.

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Matt Goren
Adjunct Assistant Professor

I assess how well financial literacy interventions affect behavior and increase quality of life.

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John Grable
Athletic Association Endowed Professor of Family and Consumer Sciences

My research interests include financial risk-tolerance assessment, behavioral financial planning, and financial decision making. My work tends to be applied and focused on helping consumers and financial service professionals navigate the increasingly complex financial marketplace. Working with colleagues in the ASPIRE clinic, I am actively engaged in conducting evidence-based research.

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Joan Koonce
Professor & Extension Financial Planning Specialist

My research examines several areas of family financial planning, financial behavior of youth and family communication about finances, and low-income consumers and poverty.

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Diann Moorman
Associate Professor

  • Scholarship of Teaching and Learning
  • Bankruptcy
  • Low-income households
  • Single-parent households
  • Teenage-mother households

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Lance Palmer
Professor

Dr. Palmer's research seeks to identify effective ways of motivating financial behavior change through brief intervention strategies. He is currently focused on developing brief interventions that are informative, scalable, and can easily be integrated into the income tax preparation process. The design and format of the brief interventions are informed by research findings from behavioral economics and behavior change theory, as well as evidenced-based counseling practices such as Solutions-Focused Brief Coaching.

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Michael Rupured
Senior Public Service Associate and Extension Financial Management Specialist

Evaluates the effectiveness of financial education programs on program participants.

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Yoo-Kyoung Seock
Associate Professor

Multi-channel retailing including social media marketing; Cultural aspects of cconsumer psychographics and behaviors; Sustainability issues in retailing and consumer behaviors

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Kimberly Skobba
Associate Professor

My research focuses on two distinct areas 1) the housing needs of low-income households and 2) the relationship between community development and social capital in rural and small towns. Through the use of a qualitative, biographical method, I study the connection between housing pathways and life circumstances of low-income households. My research on housing instability among low-income households has advanced the understanding of the different strategies that families use to maintain shelter and the ways in which personal characteristics and life course events affect their ability to find and maintain housing. My second area of research examines the housing and community development experiences and the role of social capital in community development capacity of rural and small towns. My research in this area uses surveys, qualitative data collection and case studies to better understand the housing and community development challenges and potential solutions facing rural and small town communities in the Southeastern region of the United States.

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Ann Woodyard
Assistant Professor

My research focuses on the area of financial wellness and tries to answer the questions of what financial practices lead to healthier lifestyles. I am interested in charitable giving and wellness, as well as financial literacy and the relationship between the practices we undertake and the impact those practices have on our health and wellness.

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Sheri Worthy
Professor and Department Head

I have explored a range of consumer-related topics in my research including consumer vulnerability, savings, and financial risk-taking behaviors.  Some of my recent research investigates factors influencing the vulnerability of obese consumers to weight-loss advertising and whether gambling among college students is moderated by parenting style and/or the family environment. I am also part of a multi-state research group that investigated the psychological and economics factors related to saving.

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