Sihong Liu

College of Family and Consumer Sciences

Human Development and Family Science

Ph.D. Student & Graduate Assistant

Address:
375 Dawson Hall
305 Sanford Dr.
Athens, GA 30602

E-Mail:

workOffice Phone: 706-542-4847

Curriculum Vitae

Education

Degree Field of Study Institution Graduation
Master of Science Human Development and Family Science University of Georgia 2017
Bachelor of Economics Statistics Renmin University of China 2015

Research

Sihong is currently a third-year accelerated docoral student in the Human Development & Family Science program at the University of Georgia. Her research interest falls in studying how childhood adversity impact the development of psychopathology and risky behaviors during adolescence and young adulthood. She is also interested in examining the roles of psychophysiological and biological markers (e.g., heart rate variability, skin conductance, pro-inflammatory tendencies) on the development of substance use behaviors among adolescents and young adults experienced childhood adversity. In addition, she studies factors and processes that promote adolescents’ resilience.

Sihong is the data coordinator in the Youth Development Institute

Publications

Oshri, A., Kogan, S., Liu, S., Sweet, L., & Mackillop, J. (2017). Pathways Linking Adverse Childhood Experiences to Cigarette Smoking Among Young Black Men: a Prospective Analysis of the Role of Sleep Problems and Delayed Reward Discounting. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 51(6), 890-898.

Duprey, E. B., Oshri, A., & Liu, S. (2018). Childhood maltreatment, self-esteem, and suicidal ideation in a low-SES emerging adult sample: The moderating role of heart rate variability. Archives of Suicide Research. 

Liu, S., Oshri, A., & Duprey, E. B., (in press). Alcohol Use and Depressive Symptoms among Youth Investigated for Being Maltreated: The Role of Parental Alcohol Use. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs.

Oshri, A., Duprey, E.B., Kogan, S. M., Carlson, M. W., & Liu, S. (in press). Growth Patterns of Future Orientation among Maltreated Youth: A Prospective Ecological Examination of Resilience. Developmental Psychology.